Focus-Grouped Thoughts on the Branded Page

In Guest Contributors & Editorial by Guest Contributor

By James P. Othmer MAHOPAC, NEW YORK: Writing this sentence is a brazen, deliberate and irrevocable act of branding. Trust me, before it (and all subsequent vowels and consonants below) was written, it was parsed, focus-grouped and post-mortemed by twelve angry, bookish consumers on the shiny side of a two-way mirror in Teaneck, New Jersey.  To wit, they were asked: …

Re-thinking the Publisher/Author Partnership

In Guest Contributors & Editorial by Guest Contributor

By Robert Miller NEW YORK: I’ve just read M.J. Rose’s editorial from last Friday, “Publishers Must Change the Way Authors Get Paid,” and I couldn’t agree more that it’s time to re-think the publisher/author relationship.  M.J. deserves credit for moving this conversation forward; indeed, for years M.J. has shown by her own example how authors can and should be full …

Why Bangkok?

In Guest Contributors & Editorial by Guest Contributor

By Timothy Hallinan BANGKOK: Well, as a place to live, it is undoubtedly the most cheerful big city on earth. The Thai people somehow ingest the heat, the gasoline fumes, the permanent Gordian knot of traffic, the heartbreaking poverty, and through some form of internal alchemy turn it into broad, beautiful smiles and almost infinite compassion for the befuddled, sweating …

Digital Distribution Means Global, Not Local

In Guest Contributors & Editorial by Guest Contributor

By Andrew Savikas, vice-president, O’Reilly Media Within a few years (or sooner) more people will read the books we publish at O’Reilly Media in digital form than in print. While it won’t happen that quickly for other publishers, it will happen. That doesn’t mean that print books will go away — it just means that publishing will be about digital …

Why Publishing Cannot Be Saved (As It Is)

In Guest Contributors & Editorial by Guest Contributor

Editorial by Richard Eoin Nash The book business is a tiny industry perched atop a massive hobby. But rather than celebrate and serve the hobbyists, we expect them to shell out ever more money for the books we keep throwing at them (a half million English-language books in 2008 in the U.S.). Cutting back might work for individual companies, but …