Which Chinese Books Do You Want Translated?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Today’s lead article discusses the launch of the Peony Literary Agency in Hong Kong and Beijing. The firm already represents a number of bestselling Chinese writers that have yet to attract a Western publisher, most notably, Han Han (he was deemed the sixth richest writer in China), but has yet to be translated. Another is the novel …

Is the Cliche of the Culturally Insulated American a Myth?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Today’s lead article by Emily Williams looks at the question of why so few foreign writers make it into print in the US. It’s by know become well known that approximately 3% of books published in the US are translations (and I would guess that number would be significantly smaller as soon as you factor in self-published …

Longlist for the Best Translated Book Award

In What's the Buzz by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka In the United States, Open Letter Books and Three Percent have announced the 25-strong fiction longlist of fiction titles for their second annual “Best Translated Book Award.” As prize organizer Chad Post notes: “There are some classic authors (Robert Walser, Robert Bolano), some relative unknowns (Wolf Haas, Ferenc Barnas, Cao Naiqian), and a nice geographical mix (including …

Arabic Booker’s Shortlisted Six

In Global Trade Talk by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka The shortlist for the $60,000 International Prize for Arabic Fiction 2010 (IPAF) — better known colloquially as “The Arabic Booker” — was as announced on Tuesday at the Beirut International Book Fair in Lebanon. The shortlist of six represents submissions from five countries: Egypt: A Cloudy Day on the West Side by Muhammad Al-Mansi Qindeel (Dar Al-Shorouk) …

After Six Years, Germany’s KiWi Cashes In on Infinite Jest

In Europe by Amanda DeMarco

By Amanda DeMarco COLOGNE: It was “not self-evident” that David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest would enter the German literary world, says Helge Malchow, publisher at Cologne-based Kiepenheuer & Witsch (KiWi). Buchmarkt named Malchow Publisher of the Year in 2005, the same year a Welt Online article called him “the Bismarck of German publishing, its lord and savior.” About 50% of …

German Buch News: Looking at Lübbe’s Staff Translators; Holidays May Add Up to 25% of Total Sales; Introducing Tandoku

In German Buch News by Siobhan O'Leary

By Siobhan O’Leary German publisher Lübbe has had translators on staff since 2007, and Buchreport features an interview with Klaus Kluge, Lübbe’s Sales & Marketing Director, about the merits of having in-house translators. Kluge finds that the stability is a plus, both for the publisher and the translators, who themselves have the security of a guaranteed income, as well as …

German Buch News: Amazon Tops Ranking of Germany’s Online Stores; Court Rules for More Pay for Translators

In German Buch News by Siobhan O'Leary

By Siobhan O’Leary The German E-Commerce Center Handel (ECC) — a research and consulting firm focused on e-commerce — has released the results of its ECC Shopmonitor “image ranking” survey of online shops in Germany. As reported in the Boersenblatt, Amazon landed in the top position. The ECC asked 1,000 people representative of internet users to rate online shops on …

From “Cruel Hookah” to “Cruel Hooker”: A Cross-Cultural Conversation in Poetry

In Guest Contributors & Editorial by Guest Contributor

By Christopher Merrill IOWA CITY: The book Seven Poets Four Days One Book was an experiment to see what would happen if poets from different lands, languages, and generations tried to write together. The possibilities for failure seemed limitless — which perversely appealed to me. For it has been my experience that the least promising material may sometimes yield the …

What’s the Buzz: E-books Offer Hope for Translations; 40 E-readers Expected

In News, What's the Buzz by Hannah Johnson

By Hannah Johnson The best of the blogosphere and social media… Over at Three Percent, Chad Post of Open Letter Books has written a four-part essay on e-books and translations. But, anyone lucky enough to be attending this week’s Reykjavík International Literary Festival can see him present it in person. Post argues that, because the majority of translations published in the …