Obama’s Example Should Inspire US Kids Pubs to Change

In Children's, Europe by Guest Contributor

By Sharon Glassman Today’s hard times could inspire better book times for US kids’ imprints, says Grazia Gotti, co-founder of the Giannino Stoppani cultural cooperative and children’s bookshop in Bologna and one of the organizers of the Bologna Book Fair. The secret? Arrivaderci isolation and “big marketing.”  Buon Giorno dialogue, “long-sellers” and European-style cooperation. In a chat with Publishing Perspectives, Gotti, a self-confessed …

The Billion Copy Opportunity

In Growth Markets by Guest Contributor

By Lewis Manalo CHINA: By now it’s a scene we in the West are familiar with: a swordsman or — swordswoman — makes an acrobatic leap to a stone-tiled rooftop and sets off in pursuit of a masked bandit. The swordsman leaps from roof to roof, across ridiculous distances and with such balletic grace, he seems to be on the edge …

Review: The Patience Stone by Atiq Rahimi

In Book Review by Gwendolyn Dawson

The Patience Stone by Atiq Rahimi (translated by Polly McLean) Reviewed by Gwendolyn Dawson In this slim novel, an unnamed woman ministers to her comatose husband in a small back room of their house in war-torn Afghanistan. The man, wounded by a bullet in his neck, lies inert on a dirty mattress, indifferent to the action unfolding around him, from gunshots …

What are the Biggest Obstacles to Translation?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka In today’s editorial Vanina Marsot writes about discovering that her novel about a translator is itself untranslatable — particularly into the very language it is about, French. Translation is tricky, particularly with books that are written in a distinct dialect. I’ve been told one of the joys of reading Andrea Camilleri’s Inspector Montalbano novels is the Sicilian …

The Digital Book in Practice: Valentine’s 14 Languages, Multiple Formats, Wireless Delivery

In Digital by Guest Contributor

By Alex de Campi BROOKLYN: Imagine a graphic novel series, released every month simultaneously in 14 languages and across all major wireless platforms (Kindle, e-Reader, Android phone, iPhone), hopefully soon via the Web and, eventually, in collected print editions. Every month, you pay 99 cents and get 70-75 screens of action, adventure and suspense. In its first fortnight after launch, in …

German Book Office Fiction Rights List – Fall 2009

In German Buch News by Hannah Johnson

This season’s list includes a bestselling titles from independent and large publishers in Germany, as well as a German Book Prize winner. Download the rights list PDF for further information about each title, including synopses and rights contacts. Twice a year, the German Book Office New York (GBO) presents its Rights Lists of adult fiction titles to North American publishers, …

Tell Us Translators, Are You Underpaid?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Our lead article today discusses how a translator sued a German publishing group for paying her 15 Euros per page to translate two novels from English into German, a sum she felt was too low. As a consequence, the German Federal Court of Justice ruled that translators are now entitled to claim a percentage of the proceeds …

Translators say, “Show Me the Monnaie

In Europe by Siobhan O'Leary

By Siobhan O’Leary BERLIN: Thousands of translators across Europe and the rest of the world spend their days and nights scanning their dictionaries and thesauruses for le mot juste, making their living working on everything from novels to air conditioner repair manuals. And while translators, particularly of literary texts, are ultimately tasked with the responsibility of matching the precision and …

Memories of the Future by Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky

In Book Review by Gwendolyn Dawson

Memories of the Future by Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky, translated from the Russian by Joanne Turnbull Reviewed by Gwendolyn Dawson This collection of seven loosely interconnected short stories, by turns whimsical and menacing, examines Soviet Moscow in the 1920s. In these stories Krzhizhanovsky primarily focuses on the lives of displaced intellectuals — those who, after World War I and the Russian Revolution …