Book Review: Dream of Ding Village by Yan Lianke (China)

In Book Review by Gwendolyn Dawson

By Gwendolyn Dawson In Yan Lianke’s novel, Dream of Ding Village, a remote, agricultural village in China suffers from an AIDS epidemic. Ten years ago, the inhabitants of Ding Village sold their blood to blood collectors to increase their wealth and improve their standard of living. While the blood sales allowed the villagers to replace their traditional mud and thatch huts …

Words Without Borders Latest Offers a Global View of “Queer” Culture

In What's the Buzz by Edward Nawotka

International literary magazine Words Without Borders is focusing on queer culture this month with a selection of translated stores from across the globe… From their press release: We’re delighted to again give voice to a literary tradition that examines the world through an unaccustomed lens and with uncommon clarity and vigor. Writers from Africa, Asia, the Middle East, South America, …

Nicholas Sparks, US Bestsellers Help Novo Conceito Race to the Front of Brazilian Publishing

In Growth Markets by Maria Fernanda Rodrigues

Former motorcycle racer Fernando Baracchini only started publishing trade books in 2007, but his publishing house dominates Brazil’s bestseller lists with an array of translated imports. By Maria Fernanda Rodrigues At first, Fernando Baracchini didn’t seem destined for a career in publishing. Though he grew up as scion to the Ribeirão Preto-based book chain Paraler, instead of helping his mother …

#BEA11: Books on Display the Amazon Publishing Booth

In What's the Buzz by Hannah Johnson

By Hannah Johnson Amazon has made even more waves than usual in the last few days with the announcement that the venerable Larry Kirschbaum will be in charge of Amazon’s publishing imprints. The Amazon Publishing booth on the show floor attracted plenty of visitors who wanted an advance look at what books the online retail giant would be rolling out …

Germans are Hot: Hangman’s Daughter Sells 100,000 on Amazon

In German Buch News by Siobhan O'Leary

by Siobhan O’Leary For years, those who move and shake in the international publishing scene have bemoaned the fact that only three percent of the books published in the US are books published in translation. There are signs, however, that German authors — from Jenny Erpenbeck to Daniel Kehlmann — are gaining in popularity worldwide. Ullstein’s foreign rights director Pia …

2011 Best Translated Book Award Winners Announced

In What's the Buzz by Hannah Johnson

Poetry: Aleš Šteger’s The Book of Things translated from the Slovenian by Brian Henry Fiction: Tove Jansson’s The True Deceiver translated from the Swedish by Thomas Teal Each winning author and translator will receive a $5,000 prize sponsored by Amazon.com From the press release: April 29, 2011 — The winning titles and translators for this year’s Best Translated Book Awards …

How To Get Published When You’re Not a Cliche

In Guest Contributors by Guest Contributor

David Unger is the US rep for the Guadalajara International Book Fair. Born Guatemala, he lives in New York, writes in English, but is more widely published in Spanish. By David Unger NEW YORK CITY: I am the US rep for the Guadalajara International Book Fair so I know more than I need to know about the schizoid business of …

Do Too Many Publishers Traffic in Stereotypes?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Today’s feature story by David Unger discusses his circuitous path toward publication, writing in English and being published in Spanish. One of the complaints foreign authors have who have failed to find publishers abroad is that publishers often have a narrow, if not limited view of a culture. The argument often heard is that readers expect books …

Did Russia’s Spotlight at the London Book Fair Generate Business for You?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Russia is taking several star turns at book fairs as “guest of honor” — first in London earlier this month and next year at BookExpo America. The country’s literary reputation overseas is largely based on classic texts and a handful of translated authors who have broken through — Boris Akunin, Viktor Pelevin, Tatyana Tolstaya, Lyudmila Petrushevskaya, and Lyudmila Ulitskaya …