What Is Most Needed to Develop the Global E-book Market?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

For much of the world the biggest issue is simple: lack of legally available content. By Edward Nawotka As many of the top global publishing professionals gather for UNESCO’s Focus 2011 conference in Monza, Italy, we want to know what you think is the single most pressing issue for developing the global e-book market. For much of the world the …

SURVEY: Which Rights Deal Do You Opt for Most Often?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

World rights, English-only world rights, territorial rights, language-specific rights? By Edward Nawotka “As the world becomes more and more a global marketplace, there will be fewer barriers to exploiting rights around the world,” says David Steinberger, president and publisher of Perseus Book Group. Increasingly, he notes, this means that means pursuing world rights for titles as a way of eliminating any …

Could the US Co-opt Global E-book Sales?

In Discussion by Emily Williams

By Emily Williams and Edward Nawotka Todays’ lead story looks at the aggressive development of US retailer Barnes & Noble’s Spanish-language e-bookstore and it’s broad ranges of international partnerships. The underlying assumption of a lot of conversations, whether people acknowledge it or not, is the question of whether or not, with the US’s eventually come to dominate the global e-book …

Are US Publishers Using E-books to Undermine Territorial Rights?

In What's the Buzz by Liz Bury

By Liz Bury Frankfurt Book Fair veteran agent Andrew Nurnberg has raised the specter of e-book deals being used to undermine territorial rights in an interview with Publishing Perspectives. But his fear that some American publishers may try to use e-book negotiations to break existing rights boundaries left other agents unruffled. Arguments about the primacy of authors’ relationships with their editors, …

London Book Fair Digital Conference Digest: “Take Risks, Fail, Learn and Try Again”

In English Language by Liz Bury

By Liz Bury The pre-show digital day at London Book Fair kicked off in good spirits on Sunday but regrettably, with numbers depleted due to the volcano eruption in Iceland. Slated speakers Susan Danziger from America’s DailyLit and Michael Tamblyn from Canada’s e-book store Kobo were absent, and about 20% of the seats at the sell-out conference were empty. The …