2011 Best Translated Book Award Winners Announced

In What's the Buzz by Hannah Johnson

Poetry: Aleš Šteger’s The Book of Things translated from the Slovenian by Brian Henry Fiction: Tove Jansson’s The True Deceiver translated from the Swedish by Thomas Teal Each winning author and translator will receive a $5,000 prize sponsored by Amazon.com From the press release: April 29, 2011 — The winning titles and translators for this year’s Best Translated Book Awards …

What is the Most Literary City on Earth?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Buenos Aires has been named World Book Capital for 2011 by UNESCO. UNESCO began the practice of naming World Book Capitals in 2001. Cities so honored include Madrid (Spain), followed by Alexandria (Egypt), New Delhi (India), Antwerp (Belgium), Montreal (Canada), Turin (Italy), Bogotá (Colombia), Amsterdam (Netherlands), Beirut (Lebanon), and Ljubljana (Slovenia). In 2012 the title goes to …

Has a Translation Prompted You to Seek Out The Book in the Original Language?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Today’s feature story suggests that English-language literature is at risk of being diminished because of writers’ and readers’ limited language skills in the English-speaking world. As part of that argument, he suggests that numerous titles are now being written specifically to cater to the translation market, further diminishing the richness of a work. Smith also suggests that …

“Translators are the Bottleneck” in Iceland’s Prep for Star Turn at Frankfurt 2011

In Europe by Amanda DeMarco

By Amanda DeMarco You probably never expected to hear this in reference to Icelandic literature: “Translators are the bottleneck.” But as German publishers gear up for Iceland to be the Guest of Honor at the upcoming Frankfurt Book Fair, that’s exactly how Kristof Magnusson describes the situation. Magnusson, a writer whose most recent novel Das war ich nicht was long-listed for …