As Maalouf Joins Académie Française, Label “Francophone” Questioned

In Arabic Publishing by Edward Nawotka

By Olivia Snaije PARIS: Amin Maalouf, the Franco-Lebanese author, perhaps best known for his Goncourt Prize-winning book The Rock of Tanios was admitted to the venerable Académie Française, or French Academy, in June. Maalouf is the second writer of Arab origin to accede to the Academy — in 2005 Algerian-born writer Assia Djebar was voted in. Founded in 1635, the Académie Française …

Mathias Énard’s ‘Zone’: Brilliance in a Single 517 Page Sentence

In Book Review by Guest Contributor

By Dennis Abrams It really shouldn’t work at all — Matias Énard’s Zone. This novel, the story of Francis Servain Mirkovic, fighter in the Balkan Wars, spy, and amateur historian, traveling from Milan to Rome by train, carrying a briefcase filled with names, photos, and information about the violent history of the lands surrounding the Mediterranean – the “Zone,” as …

Prix Goncourt 2011 Debut Novel Winner Announced

In Global Trade Talk by Hannah Johnson

Michel Rostain has won the 2011 Goncourt Debut Novel Prize for 2011 for his novel, The Son (Le Fils), published by Oh! Editions in Paris. The prize was announced yesterday, 1 February. Just two weeks after publication, The Son has already achieved bestseller status in France, according to Andrea Field, Foreign Rights Manager at Oh! Editions. Novels shortlisted for the …

A Very French Melancholy: Olivier Adam, the Man Who Lost the Goncourt

In Feature Articles by Guest Contributor

• The latest in Lewis Manalo’s series looking at underappreciated writers worthy of wider translation considers the work of French writer Olivier Adam, who was shortlisted for this year’s Prix Goncourt. • Prior articles in the series cover Louis Cha (China), Rodrigo Fresan (Argentina), Agnar Mykle (Norway), and Stephen Vizinczey (Hungary). By Lewis Manalo Anyone who gives half an ear …