Does the Fast-Evolving E-book Device/Platform Landscape Ultimately Benefit DRM-Happy Publishers?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Have you been loyal to a single e-book device and platform or do you graze? I’ll admit, I’m neither device agnostic nor platform or retailer agnostic. I think of all the e-reading devices I own or have owned, including a Kindle (Gens 1 & 2), an iPad, a NookColor, a Franklin Reader, a Rocket E-book, and various smartphones, PCs …

EU Report Urges 7-Year Limit on Commercially Digitized Works

In Global Trade Talk by Hannah Johnson

By Hannah Johnson Yesterday, the European Commission released a report which proposes a seven-year period of use on digitized, public domain works. This proposal seems aimed specifically at Google and its ongoing book scanning project. The New York Times reports: “During a period of preferential use, a public domain book, for instance, that was digitized by Google would be available …

Wikileaks Reveals U.S. Diplomats Pressured Spain to Adopt Harsh (and Unproven) Anti-Piracy Laws

In Global Trade Talk by Emily Williams

By Emily Williams The Public Knowledge blog responds to Wikileaks’ revelations that had been reported by El País, namely that Spain’s proposed piracy law that drew such vehement protests a year ago (as we at PP reported here) was likely influenced by direct pressure from the U.S. government, then under the George W. Bush administration. Though this pressure had evidently been in place …

Citing Creative Commons, Blogger Posts Houellebecq Novel Online for Free

In What's the Buzz by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Michel Houellebecq lifted certain portions of his novel Prix Goncourt-winning novel La carte et le territoire from Wikipedia. Not only did he admit to doing it, he insisted it’s not plagiarism, that it was simply part of his technique. Over the weekend, a French blogger has turned around and used Houellebecq’s actions as justification for posting the entirety of …

Money For Nothing, And Your Pics For Free

In What's the Buzz by Hannah Johnson

• E-books are finally embracing color images, but how much should you pay for them? Op-Ed by Gwyn Headley, Managing Director, FotoLibra When e-readers first made their appearance at the Frankfurt Book Fair a decade ago, they caused a sensation. We held the future of publishing in our hands. A lo-res page of black Times New Roman on a grey …

New Study Finds Dramatic Difference Between Author Rights in Germany, Spain, France and UK

In Global Trade Talk by Olivia Snaije

By Olivia Snaije The book and writing “observatory,” le MOTif, funded by the Paris regional government, is becoming increasingly visible in France’s book world. Le MOTif has just released a study on author rights in Europe, the result of a year-long research project about the legislatures, economic and legal aspects of the industry and more than 50 interviews with publishers, …

Should the EC Legislate Clearances for Digital Book Rights?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Today’s lead story looks at a new report from the European Commission about the status of orphan works — books, films, et al. — and what must be done to streamline rights clearances. The EC is famous for issuing rules and regulations for all manner of minutiae (the noise limit of lawnmowers, for example). Should it have a …

Will Europe’s Three Million Orphan Books Ever Be Digitized?

In Europe by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka • The EC has determined there are three million orphan books in Europe and the cost of clearing digital rights is costly, often far higher than digitization itself. • One solution might be Europe-wide collective licensing agreements modeled on those currently in use in Scandinavia. BRUSSELS: The issue of orphan books –- those books with no clear …

Should content licenses be less expensive for digital distribution?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Today’s lead article discusses the impact of digitization on copyright issues with Copyright Clearance Center’s CEO Tracey Armstrong. One of the issues raised is whether the cost of licensing content is ultimately too expensive for individuals who want to publish digitally. Armstrong believes there is something out there for everyone, from affordable all-you-can-use buffet buckets of content …