Should the EC Legislate Clearances for Digital Book Rights?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Today’s lead story looks at a new report from the European Commission about the status of orphan works — books, films, et al. — and what must be done to streamline rights clearances. The EC is famous for issuing rules and regulations for all manner of minutiae (the noise limit of lawnmowers, for example). Should it have a …

Will Europe’s Three Million Orphan Books Ever Be Digitized?

In Europe by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka • The EC has determined there are three million orphan books in Europe and the cost of clearing digital rights is costly, often far higher than digitization itself. • One solution might be Europe-wide collective licensing agreements modeled on those currently in use in Scandinavia. BRUSSELS: The issue of orphan books –- those books with no clear …

Should content licenses be less expensive for digital distribution?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Today’s lead article discusses the impact of digitization on copyright issues with Copyright Clearance Center’s CEO Tracey Armstrong. One of the issues raised is whether the cost of licensing content is ultimately too expensive for individuals who want to publish digitally. Armstrong believes there is something out there for everyone, from affordable all-you-can-use buffet buckets of content …

All Information Doesn’t Want to Be Free

In Digital by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka “Copyright holders have the right to price and term the works that they have created, the works that they own. That’s a stake in the ground. I couldn’t do what I do for a living without believing that,” says Tracey Armstrong (pictured right), CEO of the Copyright Clearance Center, in a conversation earlier this week on the …

Author Contracts 2.0: Putting Cash Before Copyright and Control

In Digital by Liz Bury

By Liz Bury In the world of multi-channel digital distribution the future author contract is likely to put transparency and cash flow above copyright protection, as a new working dynamic emerges between publishers and authors. The advent of digital distribution means that authors should “surrender to the inevitable” and let go of control of their work, said Clive Rich, principal …

Do Books Need a Warning Label to Ward Off Pirates?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka In our lead story today about the IPA Copyright Symposium held in Abu Dhabi this past Sunday and Monday, Marybeth Peters, register of copyrights, Library of Congress in the United States said that public perception of copyright is eroding and that publishers need to “engage” readers so that “copyright is seen as a good thing” and “not …

Strengthening Copyright Protections in the Middle East

In Growth Markets by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka ABU DHABI: “Copyright is the legal principle that expresses society’s respect for authors and publishers, and protects the commercial interest in their creation,” said, Herman P. Spruijt, President of the International Publishers Association (IPA), at the IPA Copyright Symposium which took place this past Sunday and Monday in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. “It is at the …

Is Territorial Copyright Defensible in the Age of E-books?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka The instant and virtually frictionless digital distribution of e-books is posing a real challenge to the enforcement of territorial copyright. As discussed in our lead article today, English language e-books are in demand all over the globe. But that demand is likely to put US, UK and even Australian publishers in conflict over territorial copyright. The answer …

E-books Should Be Like Television (And Other Ideas from Digital Book World)

In Digital by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka “E-books should be like television,” said literary agent Larry Kirshbaum, founder of LJK Literary Management, at the first annual Digital Book World conference held in New York this past Tuesday and Wednesday. The former publisher-turned-agent offered a vision of e-books that resembles the way a television works, where you can turn on a Nokia device in Finland, …

Google Forced to Pay €300,000 Fine to French Pubs

In German Buch News by Siobhan O'Leary

By Siobhan O’Leary As reported by the Associated Press (via the LA Times), a Paris court has ruled against Google in a copyright infringement case brought by French publisher La Martinière on behalf of itself and the French Publishers Association (FPA), representing 400 publishing companies. Google was ordered to pay €300,000 in damages to La Martinière for making excerpts of …