Is it Time for Publishers to Offer Advertising in Books?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Today’s feature story considers the implications of implementing the “Spotify for books” model from the reader’s and author’s point-of-view. One of the key questions concerns the tolerance for advertising in books. While the publisher’s perspective on this question will be addressed in tomorrow’s issue, it will be interesting to hear your perspective today? What do you think …

Does the Book Biz Set Up Second Books to Fail?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Today’s lead story recounts the travails of various authors, agents and editors in dealing with selling, writing and publishing second books. It’s long been held that a “second book jinx” exists. Do you think it’s true? Personally, I have several friends who have struggled with their second books. But the reason has as much to do with …

Do Analytics and Fan Interaction Help or Hinder Authors?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Today’s lead story discusses what the book contract of the future might entail. A big part of that future is the new resource of online analytics that will enable authors to engage more fully and in real time with their readers, typically through blogging or social media. As Liz Bury, author of the article, explained to me …

Author Contracts 2.0: Putting Cash Before Copyright and Control

In Digital by Liz Bury

By Liz Bury In the world of multi-channel digital distribution the future author contract is likely to put transparency and cash flow above copyright protection, as a new working dynamic emerges between publishers and authors. The advent of digital distribution means that authors should “surrender to the inevitable” and let go of control of their work, said Clive Rich, principal …

Random Preparing for E-book Rights Fight

In What's the Buzz by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka A pair of articles in the US press—one hitting the front page of the New York Times and another in the Wall Street Journal—cite a letter sent on Friday by Random House to US literary agents restating their assertion that they hold the e-book rights to books they have under contract. In letter, dated Dec. 11, Markus Dohle, …

What’s the Buzz: E-Rights and No-Compete Clauses; Adobe Flash Does Multi-Touch; Library 101

In What's the Buzz by Hannah Johnson

By Hannah Johnson At PubRants, literary agent Kristin Nelson writes about electronic rights and no-compete clauses in book contracts. According to Nelson’s interpretation of standard no-compete language, “even if you are able to reserve your electronic rights so as to as to set up your own deal with Kindle or Scribd (or whoever), your publisher could make an argument that …

Top US/UK Trade Talk: Rethinking Contracts; Borders UK at Risk

In Global Trade Talk, News by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka At BookBrunch, Preface publisher Trevor Dolby challenges publishers to use the economic crisis as an opportunity to reassess the conventional publishing contract, one he suggests isn’t so different from the credit default swaps that got us into this mess. “Author advances are the original no-doc mortgages. They base their lending decision on nothing more than a feeling …