Is Reading a Graphic Novel Adaptation of a Classic “Cheating?”

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Today’s lead story looks at the publishing program of Campfire Books, an Indian graphic novel company that is exporting comic book versions of Western classics around the world. The books are proving especially popular with teachers and schools, as a result of both their high quality and low cost, not to mention their appeal to younger readers. …

Advantage India: Delhi’s Campfire Classics Hark Back to Golden Age of Comics

In Growth Markets by Edward Nawotka

• Indian graphic novel publisher Campfire Books has begun exporting affordable Western classics to the US and other English-speaking nations around the world. • Among the advantages the company has is the ability to keep most of the work in-house. The company employs a bullpen of 20 full-time artists on staff to do with drawing and coloring, thus helping to keep …

Middle East Graphic Novelists Push Boundaries

In Growth Markets by Chip Rossetti

By Chip Rossetti • Last week, we looked the market for comic books and graphic novels in the Middle East is small, but growing. • In this, the second part of our two-part series, we examine how graphic novelists in the Middle East are pushing the boundaries of publishing by tackling controversial topics in their work, but also paying a price …

Are Graphic Novels and Comics More Dangerous than Prose Novels?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Today’s lead story looks at how graphic novelists are pushing boundaries and challenging taboos in the Middle East. In one case, that of Magdy El Shafee’s groundbreaking Metro, the Egyptian courts objected to its depiction of corruption and criminality, fined the author and publisher, and had the book pulled from store shelves. Surely, this is not an …

Are Comics a Universal Medium?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Today’s lead story looks at the emergence of comics and graphic novels in the Middle East. Different cultures have different relationships to graphic novels: the French and Belgians are passionate about their bande dessinée, the Japanese are mad for manga, while Americans are still best known for their superhero comics. Word pictures date back to the cave paintings of …

Do Comic Book Apps Risk Being Bad Animation?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka In our lead article we look at a conversation at the London Book Fair about the future of comic books in the digital age. As more and more publishers translate comics into apps, the question of how to re-imagine the format becomes all the more important. Without new thinking, do comic book apps risk resembling little more …

Digitizing Double Page Explosions: London Looks at Comics as E-books

In Europe by Liz Bury

By Liz Bury LONDON: The Comics & Graphic Novels Pavilion, complete with Comics Café, made its debut at the the London Book Fair this year. The category has enjoyed an upswing in the UK in recent years, as products from the US and Japanese manga has tapped a growing market, and the new forum generated some of the biggest buzz …

Are Graphic Novels Ideally Suited to Digital?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

by Edward Nawotka Today’s lead story by Alex de Campi describes the publication of Valentine, a serialized, digital-first graphic novel that is being translated and published simultaneously in 14 languages. It’s an amazing feat, and one that makes sense when one considers the relatively small amount of text on the typical page of a graphic novel. At the same time, …