Who Do You Admire in Publishing?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Today we inaugurate an occasional series of stories about people we admire in publishing. Lauren Cerand, an independent publicist based in New York City does great work with authors, publishers and booksellers. She is also the Board Chair of Girls Write Now, a writing and mentoring program for at-risk high school girls. We’d love to know who …

Are We All Entpreneurs Now?

In Discussion by Hannah Johnson

By Hannah Johnson In today’s feature article, Chip Rossetti explains that even now that’s he’s in graduate school — after leaving an editorial career in New York, and then an editing job in the Middle East — he’s never really left publishing. He talks about the need to diversify his professional identity in today’s business and publishing climate. People change …

Second Careers, or Why You Never Really Leave Publishing

In Guest Contributors by Chip Rossetti

By Chip Rossetti In the fall of 2004, I was an editor at a New York publishing house, acquiring serious narrative nonfiction and history. I had been working in trade publishing for nine years. I had also, in the wake of 9/11, been studying Arabic in the evenings, going to a teacher’s house in the outer boroughs once a week …

Does Working in Publishing Help or Hinder Your Writing?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Today’s lead story looks at how Vintage Books publicist Sloane Crosley balances her day job with her night time passion. It’s often said that everyone in publishing secretly wants to be a writer. But is working in publishing really a good idea for a writer? What does all the exposure to the treadmill of new books, underwhelming …

Did Working in Publishing Abroad Help Your Career at Home?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka As our continuing series on “publishing expats” continues (read the first article here and today’s article here), it raises the question of whether working abroad is a benefit or a detriment to your career. The personal advantages are obvious, but professionally, it can go either way. My personal experience was mixed. I found that on returning to …

Career Reinvention for Publishing Professionals

In Guest Contributors by Guest Contributor

By Andrew R. Malkin NEW YORK CITY: Fifteen years ago, after I already had spent ten years in trade book publishing with three major houses, I thought I had figured out my dream destination: a marketing manager spot under the tutelage of Carl Lennertz, at Knopf.  I had held two field sales positions for the Knopf Publishing Group in what …