Publishing Poetry? Market to Australians!

In Global Trade Talk by Hannah Johnson

By Hannah Johnson According to a survey conducted by the Australia Council for the Arts, 84% of Australians are avid readers of literature and one in five survey respondents read poetry. The results also showed that 15-24 year-olds are the most engaged in creating art online, whether that is writing, visual arts, theater or music. The Australia Council even made …

Is Territorial Copyright Defensible in the Age of E-books?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka The instant and virtually frictionless digital distribution of e-books is posing a real challenge to the enforcement of territorial copyright. As discussed in our lead article today, English language e-books are in demand all over the globe. But that demand is likely to put US, UK and even Australian publishers in conflict over territorial copyright. The answer …

Australian Government Keeps Protections for Publishers

In Feature Articles by Andrew Wilkins

By Andrew Wilkins CANBERRA: Today, an intense year-long debate about the future of Australia’s publishing industry effectively came to an end with the announcement that the Australian government had rejected a proposal from its own think-tank to turn Australian into an open market for books. ”The Government has decided not to change the Australian regulatory regime for books … In …

Bonus Material: What Do You Think of Australia’s Decision?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

Back in August, we asked you what you thought about the Australian Productivity Commission’s proposal to turn Australia into an open market for books. The overwhelming majority of responses were against the proposed changes. Today, that proposal was rejected by the Australian government. Was it the right decision or is the government stifling free-market competition? Tell us what you think …

Global Trade Talk: Big Book Awards, US Price Wars, Germany’s Scoyo for Sale

In Global Trade Talk by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka and Siobhan O’Leary On Monday, Marie NDiaye won France’s Prix Goncourt for her novel Trois puissantes femmes (Three Strong Women). Meanwhile, this past Sunday, Nam Le was awarded Australia’s richest prize for fiction, the AUS $100,000 Prime Minister’s Literary Award for Fiction for his short story collection, The Boat. The non-fiction prize, which also carries a AUS $100,000 …

Aussie’s Take Two of Germany’s Top Children’s Prizes

In News by Guest Contributor

By Tim Coronel Australian authors Shaun Tan and Marcus Zusak have been announced as winners in two of the major categories at the Deutsche Jugendliteraturpreis, Germany’s most prestigious awards for children’s and YA books. [Pictured: the display of Shaun Tan’s books at the Frankfurt Book Fair by his German publisher Carlsen] The awards ceremony, held on Friday night as part …

Could This Be the End of Territorial Copyright?

In Feature Articles by Andrew Wilkins

By Andrew Wilkins Frankfurt’s enduring relevance as an international rights fair is built to a great extent on the principle of territorial copyright—that invisible patchwork of rights territories that covers the globe. But what if there was no territorial copyright to enable publishers to safely invest in intellectual property in their own country, safe in the knowledge that another publisher …

Global Trade Talk: Zero Day “Compromise” on Aussie Parallel Import Laws; Stanford Publishing Program Shutters

In Global Trade Talk by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka The Australian reports that Australian Competition Minister Craig Emerson has suggested a new “compromise” with regard to the proposed changes in parallel importation laws. Instead of eliminating import restrictions and forcing publishers to print an international title within 30 days of overseas release, the new plan would keep the import restriction in place, provided publishers put the …

Global Trade Talk: Bookseller Retail Awards; Hachette’s POD Facility; Aussie Book Imports

In Global Trade Talk, News by Hannah Johnson

By Hannah Johnson At The Bookseller Retail Awards last night, almost all of the major retailers nominated for an award walked away with one. At the start of the ceremony, Bookseller editor-in-chief Niell Denny’s announced that the Retail Awards would merge with the British Bookseller Awards in 2010. A highlight among the presenters was Peter Usborne, who presented the award …

The Most Hated Book Down Under

In Feature Articles by Andrew Wilkins

Editorial by Andrew Wilkins MELBOURNE: Australia is a nation of booklovers, but you won’t find many fans for a new Australian paperback, ISBN 9781740372817. In fact, there’s an argument for saying it’s “Australia’s Most Hated Book.” That’s because it’s a report by an Australian Government think-tank, the Productivity Commission, which recommends (among other things) the abolition of the copyright protections …