Did Sebastian Junger Go Too Far in Calling His Book “War”?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Lewis Manalo, a veteran of the war in Afghanistan, thinks so. In today’s editorial, he argues that Junger’s War is riddled with bad reporting, significant omissions, and is condescending to the soldiers themselves. The problem may start with the title, which is almost absurd in its presumption. Read theeditorial and let us know what you think in …

Sebastian Junger, War Tourist

In Guest Contributors, Resources by Guest Contributor

Editorial by Lewis Manalo NEW YORK: As a sapper in the 82nd Airborne Division I took part in combat missions in Eastern Afghanistan during deployments in 2002 and 2003. A sapper’s main role on missions was to trek along in support of the infantry, sweeping for land mines and blowing up weapons caches and unexploded ordinance. Other times, we participated …

Review: The Patience Stone by Atiq Rahimi

In Book Review by Gwendolyn Dawson

The Patience Stone by Atiq Rahimi (translated by Polly McLean) Reviewed by Gwendolyn Dawson In this slim novel, an unnamed woman ministers to her comatose husband in a small back room of their house in war-torn Afghanistan. The man, wounded by a bullet in his neck, lies inert on a dirty mattress, indifferent to the action unfolding around him, from gunshots …

Bonus Material: Essays from the Afghan Women’s Writing Project

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka The Afghan Women’s Writing Project offers young writers the opportunity to express themselves in a form that was forbidden under the Taliban. The situation for these writers remains precarious, yet they persist in pursuing their craft and having their stories told. Afghan Women’s Writing Project founder Masha Hamilton has offered these samples of the work of some …