Brazilian Publishers Still Growing Despite Global Recession

In Growth Markets by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Despite the general global economic downturn, Brazilian publishing has proven surprisingly resilient. For much of the past decade, the business has been growing at a steady clip, reaching $3.3 billion reals ($1.93 billion) in 2008—a rise of 9.71% over 2007. It is the eighth biggest book market in the world and the largest in South America, accounting …

Turkmenistan’s Tragicomic Publishing Revolution

In Feature Articles, Guest Contributors by Daniel Kalder

By Daniel Kalder When the Turkmen Soviet Socialist Republic was invented in 1925, the literacy rate among its mostly nomadic population was somewhere between 2-3%. By 1970 not only had universal literacy been achieved, but the country had acquired its own national literature and mini-canon of “great authors,” many of them writing in forms—novels, plays, film scripts—that had been alien …

Cengage CEO Ron Dunn on Re-imagining Information Portals and TXTBKS

In Feature Articles by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Last year, when Thomson sold off its education division, a new brand was born—Cengage Learning.  Cengage still retains many of the core characteristics that made Thomson Learning such a juggernaut—focusing on providing textbooks and education materials to schools, universities, and professional organizations—but the company has also been forced to re-imagine itself for the future. It is, by itself, …

Global Trade Talk: Big Book Awards, US Price Wars, Germany’s Scoyo for Sale

In Global Trade Talk by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka and Siobhan O’Leary On Monday, Marie NDiaye won France’s Prix Goncourt for her novel Trois puissantes femmes (Three Strong Women). Meanwhile, this past Sunday, Nam Le was awarded Australia’s richest prize for fiction, the AUS $100,000 Prime Minister’s Literary Award for Fiction for his short story collection, The Boat. The non-fiction prize, which also carries a AUS $100,000 …

Changes and Challenges in the Supply Chain

In Feature Articles by Guest Contributor

By John Mutter of Shelf Awareness Online challenges and opportunities were major themes yesterday at the 31st International Supply Chain seminar, sponsored by Editeur and the Boersenverein. Jonathan Nowell of Nielsen Book noted that the difficult economy has led to a “huge shift in consumer spending.” While the freefall has ended, he said, “restraint characterizes consumer spending behavior.” Book sales …

China Offers Ample Opportunities, Despite Global Gloom, Say Publishers

In Feature Articles by Guest Contributor

By Xing Daiqi BEIJING: The slogan of this week’s 16th Beijing International Book Fair (BIBF) is “To see what the world is reading.” But with China’s position as the engine of the global economy reinforced under the present financial crisis, the world is increasingly curious about what China is reading. Still, in spite of the economic downturn, more than half …

German Buch News: Berlin’s Students Launch Virtual Bookstore

In German Buch News, News by Siobhan O'Leary

By Siobhan O’Leary A new virtual academic bookstore/library has been founded by Berlin students for students. The platform, called PaperC.de, provides free access to academic texts and can be searched by key word, author, title or ISBN. BuchMarkt reports that users can pay extra for certain services, like copying and pasting, printing pages, or marking certain passages. What’s more, it’s all completely …

Top US/UK Trade Talk: More Google Confusion, Gaming Amazon, B&N Gets Bigger

In Global Trade Talk, News by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Last week William Morris Endeavor (WME) said it was advising its clients to opt out of the Google Settlement because they objected to the seemingly indefinite royalty terms their clients would be bound to accept. This week, the Author’s Guild – one of the organizations leading the initial fight against Google – says that WME is wrong, …

German Buch News: Books are #3 in Online Shopping Popularity

In German Buch News, News by Siobhan O'Leary

By Siobhan O’Leary A recent survey conducted by Bitkom (the German Association for Information Technology, Telecommunications and New Media), published in the Boersenblatt, reveals that books are the third most popular products purchased online. Plane and train tickets were first, while concert tickets came in second. According to Bitkom, 35% of those surveyed have purchased a book online. Music landed …