The Internet is Africa’s “Gutenberg Moment”

In Growth Markets by Tolu Ogunlesi

By Tolu Ogunlesi “There are lively publishing enterprises in different areas of Africa that are not formalized in the European sense. But they exist, they are not cataloged, [they] don’t have ISBN numbers… there’s no systemic way of tracking and engaging these enterprises…” said Muhtar Bakare, founder of Kachifo Limited, an independent literary publishing house in Lagos, Nigeria, during a …

Why Smart Publishers Care About Tech Conferences

In Europe by Hannah Johnson

By Hannah Johnson PARIS: Last week’s LeWeb, the largest technology conference in Europe, attracted nearly nearly 2,400 attendees from 50 countries. Started in 2005 by Loic Le Meur (founder and CEO of Seesmic) and his wife Geraldine, it has become perhaps the premier Internet related conference in Europe and a key venue for the launch of new products and initiatives …

A Free Library for Every Family (in Sharjah)

In Guest Contributors by Chip Rossetti

By Chip Rossetti SHARJAH, UAE: While many countries would like to encourage a “culture of reading” in their citizens, perhaps no government has taken a more direct role in promoting reading than the United Arab Emirate of Sharjah, through its official initiative known as “Knowledge Without Borders.” Conceived under the auspices of the ruler of Sharjah, H.H. Sheikh Dr. Sultan …

Bonus Material: Is Asia Truly Ahead of the West in Digital Innovation and Adoption?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka In today’s lead article about the Singapore Writers Festival, Peter Gordon, Hong Kong publisher of Chameleon Press, suggested that some parts of Asia were slow movers in the race towards literary digitization. He said: E-publishing “is awaited with a combination of anticipation of the possibilities and trepidation about the effects it may have on the traditional publishing …

A Cautionary Tale about POD

In Guest Contributors by Guest Contributor

By Joanne Gail Johnson PORT-OF-SPAIN: In the Caribbean, we struggle, like other people around the globe, for increased media autonomy and international participation on our own terms. A long, long, long time ago, before I was a published author, when my childhood love of books was being nourished in Trinidad on the imported imaginings of Dr. Seuss rhyme and Enid …

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Hugo Chávez’s Color Coded “Revolutionary Reading Plan”

In Feature Articles by Emily Williams

By Emily Williams No friend to publishing (see our earlier coverage here) Venezuelan president Hugo Chávez has nevertheless started to implement his four-part color coded “Revolutionary Reading Plan.” Announced in May, the goal of the project as stated by the Venezuelan government, is “the democratization of books and reading, with a new conception of reading as a collective act under …

China Offers Ample Opportunities, Despite Global Gloom, Say Publishers

In Feature Articles by Guest Contributor

By Xing Daiqi BEIJING: The slogan of this week’s 16th Beijing International Book Fair (BIBF) is “To see what the world is reading.” But with China’s position as the engine of the global economy reinforced under the present financial crisis, the world is increasingly curious about what China is reading. Still, in spite of the economic downturn, more than half …

Bonus Material: Turkey’s Perpetual Publishing Crisis

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka In 2010, Istanbul, Turkey will serve as a European Capital of Culture, along with Essen, Germany and Pécs, Hungary. The selection gives the country an opportunity to show off its historical heritage, even if, according to Selçuk Altun — novelist and former executive chairman of YKY (Yapi Kredi Publications) — the current literary life is somewhat lacking. …

Harper UK’s Lucy Vanderbilt on Chinese Opportunties

In Feature Articles by Roger Tagholm

By Roger Tagholm LONDON & BEIJING: At a time when ‘flat’ is the new ‘up’ in the UK, publishers are eager, some  might event say desperate, to find new markets – and as relatively untapped markets go, none comes bigger than China. HarperCollins has been quick to realise this and is already reaping the benefits.  At last week’s British Book …