Aussie’s Take Two of Germany’s Top Children’s Prizes

In News by Guest Contributor

By Tim Coronel Australian authors Shaun Tan and Marcus Zusak have been announced as winners in two of the major categories at the Deutsche Jugendliteraturpreis, Germany’s most prestigious awards for children’s and YA books. [Pictured: the display of Shaun Tan’s books at the Frankfurt Book Fair by his German publisher Carlsen] The awards ceremony, held on Friday night as part …

Could This Be the End of Territorial Copyright?

In Feature Articles by Andrew Wilkins

By Andrew Wilkins Frankfurt’s enduring relevance as an international rights fair is built to a great extent on the principle of territorial copyright—that invisible patchwork of rights territories that covers the globe. But what if there was no territorial copyright to enable publishers to safely invest in intellectual property in their own country, safe in the knowledge that another publisher …

Graphic Novels Spur DC Comics’ Global Growth

In Feature Articles by Guest Contributor

By Chris Artis Even during the worldwide economic downturn, the global popularity of graphic novels continues to grow, says Sandy Resnick, DC Comics’ Director of International Business Development. “Fortunately for us, it’s been a growing category in general bookstores for a long time now. This adoption is at different stages in different countries, but it still seems to be increasing …

What’s the Buzz: Merkel Concerned About Online Copyright; Schmidt Wins German Book Prize

In What's the Buzz by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka On the eve of the opening of the Frankfurt Book Fair, German Chancellor Angela Merkel made it clear that she’s uncomfortable with the proposed Google Book Settlement. Speaking in her weekly video podcast, she expressed excitement about attending the Fair, while adding that “The German government has a clear position: copyrights have to be protected on the …

German Buch News: Müller and Her Publisher on Winning the Nobel

In German Buch News by Siobhan O'Leary

By Siobhan O’Leary Herta Müller has already been published in 25 languages, including English, Spanish, Swedish, Danish and French, and that number is sure to grow (and grow quickly) now that she has been awarded this year’s Nobel Prize for Literature. Praised by the Nobel judges for depicting the “landscape of the dispossessed” with “the concentration of poetry and the frankness of …

Global Trade Talk: Is the Nobel too Eurocentric?; America Gets Film of Dragon Tattoo

In Global Trade Talk by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Peter Englund, the new permanent secretary of the Swedish Academy told the Associated Press that the Nobel Prize is too “Eurocentric,” noting that Europeans have won nine out of the last ten awards. The comments come just two days before the announcement, which is expected tomorrow. Could this bode well for Amoz Oz, the frontrunner? After all, …

German Buch News: Bertelsmann Founder Mohn Dies; Roth Wins Die Welt Lit Prize

In German Buch News by Siobhan O'Leary

By Siobhan O’Leary Reinhard Mohn, the post-war founder of German media giant Bertelsmann, has died at the age of 88 (as reported in a press release from the company and covered in BuchReport). Mohn was born in Gütersloh in 1921, the fifth generation of the Bertelsmann/Mohn business family, and took over the reins of his family’s printing and publishing house C. …

Finding #happiness on Twitter

In Guest Contributors by Guest Contributor

Editorial by Sharon Glassman Different social media have different theme songs. By this I mean: a combo of info-pacing and density that creates a kind of silent, yet powerful tune. Linked In’s theme-song is coldly John Cage-esque. Facebook’s theme song is jarringly jam-bandish. Twitter’s theme song, by contrast is the Popcorn Song. As a book-loving, book-writing-n-writing-about person, that kind of …

Global Trade Talk: Does Indian Fiction Lack Ambition?; Dylan Thomas Prize Goes Annual

In Global Trade Talk by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka While much of world is enamored with Indian English-language novelists, those at home are not always so impressed. Looking at the shortlist for the Shakti Bhatt First Book Prize, Hartosh Singh Bal expresses his discontent with the current state of Indian fiction in the most recent issue of Open magazine. He asserts that “the literature of this …