Frankfurt on a Shoestring

In Feature Articles by Olivia Snaije

By Olivia Snaije With the Frankfurt Book Fair looming, UK independent publishers hard hit by the economic crisis are trimming and pruning wherever they can for the upcoming Book Fair. While the Book Fair is considered vital, a general trend is that publishers will be sending fewer people to Frankfurt this year. Juliet Mabey, publisher and co-founder of Oneworld based …

Global Trade Talk: The Fight for Bologna’s Fourth Day, LBF Highlights Russia in 2011

In Global Trade Talk, News by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka The Bologna Children’s Book Fair may be forced to reinstate its fourth day following protests from international publishers, reports The Bookseller. Fair organizers decided to shorten the event from four days to three without consulting exhibitors, or without a reduction of fees. Numerous publishers have refused to pay deposits for next year exhibits until the fourth day …

The Bookseller of Baghdad (Part One)

In Feature Articles by Chip Rossetti

By Chip Rossetti Today Publishing Perspectives offers a rare and exclusive profile of Ibrahim Anas Al-Rajab, director of Baghdad’s legendary Al-Muthanna Library, and one of Iraq’s leading booksellers. Part one, published today, focuses on the history of the store, from the early 20th century to 1999, when it mysteriously burnt down. Tomorrow, we continue with Part 2, picking up from …

Digital Distribution Means Global, Not Local

In Guest Contributors by Guest Contributor

By Andrew Savikas, vice-president, O’Reilly Media Within a few years (or sooner) more people will read the books we publish at O’Reilly Media in digital form than in print. While it won’t happen that quickly for other publishers, it will happen. That doesn’t mean that print books will go away — it just means that publishing will be about digital …

Who Controls African Literature?

In Feature Articles by Tolu Ogunlesi

Editorial by Tolu Ogunlesi LAGOS: The literary world is once again shining a spotlight on Africa. There are new prizes: the South Africa-based PEN Studzinski Literary Award for short stories, and the Penguin Prize for African Writing, a pan-African prize covering both fiction and non-fiction genres. There’s a new book series, the “Penguin African Writers Series,” which will include not …

Macmillan’s Caribbean Dream

In Feature Articles by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka PORT-OF-SPAIN, TRINIDAD: “I visited a library in Cedros on the southern most part of our island,” said writer and editor Joanne Gail Johnson,”from the outside it looked like an old hut, one with all the filigreed carving on the eaves. You stand there and you can see the sea through the palm trees. It looks almost dilapidated. …

Bonus Material: How to Sell S** in Afrikaans

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Despite numerous literary luminaries at this past weekend’s Cape Town Book Fair, it’s still the dirty stuff that sells. It seems that the most headline grabbing event of the Fair has been the launch of former stripper and now single-mother Karin Eloff’s Afrikaans-language memoir Stiletto. “I started hating men,” writes Eloff, “All men. Men, I decided, had …

Bonus Material: USA’s Thomas Wins £100,000 Dublin IMPAC Prize

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

DUBLIN: Michael Thomas’ 2007 novel Man Gone Down won this years £100,000 Dublin IMPAC Literary award, reputed to be the richest single prize offered for fiction in the world. The book is more than appropriate for these tyring times, as it tells the story of a down-on-his-luck man with just four days to raise enough money to keep his family …