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Time & Place Session Description Speakers
8:40–9:10
Platinum I+II

Keynote: Persevering in the Middle

Faced with rapidly evolving customer preferences and price expectations, changes in the balance of power between publishers and intermediaries, the commoditization of content and an explosion in new business models, our industry has embarked on an epic journey in pursuit of relevance and sustainability. In order to stay competitive, most publishers recognize the need to fundamentally change what they do. But we are not able to change instantly from old to new — from print to digital or from products to services, for example — if it means abandoning businesses and activities that are still profitable. As a result, we find ourselves with one foot on the boat ready to sail to the bright new future and the other still planted on the shore of comfortable (and profitable) legacy businesses, with increasing discomfort!

To resolve this dilemma companies are faced with difficult trade-off decisions. Striving to protect a legacy business while exploring new opportunities creates competition for scarce resources. As legacy businesses struggle for growth tough decisions are required to improve operational efficiency. New skills and organizational capabilities must be acquired to succeed in new business development. But many publishers are overcoming these challenges by building new businesses that expand on existing strengths and assets, the quality and depth of our content, our trusted brands, growing knowledge of our customers and the enduring relationships we have built with our authors, clients and other partners.

Stephen Smith, President and CEO, Wiley
9:10–9:40
Platinum I + II

Keynote: How the Internet Will Change an Ancient Technology Called Ebook

While Amazon is trying to become Apple, the ebook market suffers in many ways. A confusing mixture of fear and wishful thinking is the reason ebook readers are treated like boldfaced children. Surprisingly, they’re not pleased, even if they sometimes still don’t know it. Books should be purchasable, digital goods — but be part of the internet at the same time. The great Max Goldt once wrote, head shops offer anything you need to smoke weed except the only thing you really need to smoke weed. This is true for books and the internet, too. Anyone can find anything about books in the web, apart from the content of the book itself. It’s time to change that, and Sobooks tries to.

Sascha Lobo, Internet expert/Founder, Sobooks
9:40–10:10
Platinum I + II

Startup Showcase Judges Panel

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10:40–11:30
Platinum I

What is the Future of Bookselling?

In a lively discussion about the future of bookselling, book culture, and the book business, our outspoken and experienced panelists will debate not only whether bookstores can survive in the age of the Internet, but examine the reasons — economical and cultural that they should or should not. Join this session and add your own voice to the conversation about whither goes the bookstore.

Rachel Fershleiser, Tumblr; Sascha Lobo, Sobooks; Paul Rhodes, Orb Entertainment; Torsten Casimir, mvb
10:40–11:30
Platinum II

Supply Chain Track — Reader Rights: Exhaustion and Digital Resale

“Are books sold or licensed? This session focuses on the contrasts between the worlds of physical — where books are sold — and digital — where books are licensed. As publishers and readers move to digital, understanding the differences becomes more critical to publishers and retailers, and the expectations of the market become more controversial. The speakers have direct experience of what those market expectations are, and can help gauge the tensions within the supply chain.

Peter Balis, Wiley; tba; moderated by Laurence Kaye, Shoosmiths
10:40–11:30
Alabaster I + II

From Startups to Publishing Companies Ripe for Expansion: What Investors in the Media Sector are Looking For

This panel of venture capitalists, private equity funders, publishing startups and established publishers whose growth was made possible through equity investments will share their experiences, offer advice to others in the same boats, and discuss the pros and cons of publishers and investors working together.

Nick Perrett, HarperCollins; others tba
10:40–11:30
Gold I + II

Big Data/Little Data: The Practical Capture, Analysis and Integration of Data for Publishers

Join our panel of experts as they help publishers figure out what data they can be capturing/analyzing – not focusing just on big data, but on social data, in-house and enterprise sales data, customer service data, metadata, etc. – and how they can customize a proactive and practical integration of data gathering, analysis and implementation.

Kristin McClean, Bookigee; Sebastian Posth, Publishing Data Networks; Laura Dawson, Bowker
10:40–11:30
Gold III

Print! Critical to the Future of Educational Publishing — We Can Tell You Why and How!

Let us tell you why PRINT is an essential element of educational publishing, even in a world where e-delivery of education content is growing. Come to learn how digital printing reduces costs while you transform the educational publishing market.

Douglas Sexton & Udi Chatow, Hewlett Packard
12:00–12:50
Platinum I

The Future of Metadata

Metadata are rapidly becoming the key driver in marketing and selling of books and media. At the same rate, the complexity of metadata is growing. In book and media catalogues of millions of titles the discoverability of the individual book, song or movie will be the main marketing tool of the future. Traditional processes of metadata management are quickly coming to their limits; tagging of keywords by an editor or the rigid classification in product schemas can not only be insufficient — it can effectively reduce the discoverabilty.

Future management tools for metadata will be based on standardised and automated text recognition through semantic analytics, they will be language independent and always recur to the content itself. Nowadays more content related to an individual book can be found outside of the book than inside it. Future metadata will draw on that outside content that can come in the form of blogs, content of social networks or search engine data.

These developments will profoundly change the work of metadata producers. They will have to adopt semantic and linguistic technologies, they will grow beyond language barriers and they manage and curate third party social content.

Ronald Schild, mvb
12:00–12:50
Platinum II

Supply Chain Track — IPA Data Date 2013: Exploring and Mapping Global Digital Publishing Markets

As e-book markets evolve, mapping and understanding the hugely diverse patchwork of local developments become critical for national as well as global players alike. Yet reliable information is often difficult to find. The International Publishers Association, IPA, has therefore approached organizations that specialize in gathering and analyzing international market data to share specific and relevant findings. This first ‘IPA Data Date’ will focus particularly on emerging markets in China, Brazil and India, as well as on recent developments in the continental Europe and in the US.

Anne Betts of Nielsen Bookscan will discuss the print and e-book markets in India and in China.

Carlo Carrenho of PublishNews Brazil will analyze recent developments in digital publishing and distribution in Brazil.

Len Vlahos of the Book Industry Study Group, will comment on the US e-book market, based on BISG’s BookStats 2013 report.

Rüdiger Wischenbart of Content and Consulting will look at the expanding e-book markets in continental Europe, notably Germany and France, based on his regular Global Ebook report.

Anne Betts, Nielsen Bookscan; Carlo Carrenho, PublishNews; Len Vlahos, BISG; Rüdiger Wischenbart, consultant; moderated by Jens Bannel, IPA
12:00–12:50
Alabaster I + II

Digital Publishing and the Open Web: W3C’s Digital Publishing Industry Group

In 2013 a strong cooperation started between the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the major players of the publishing industry, first and foremost IDPF. The goal of this cooperation is to secure a better synchronization between, on the one hand, the technical developments of Web standards at W3C and, on the other hand, the developments of Web-based technologies in the publishing industry, like EPUB. This cooperation should give a stronger voice for the publishing industry in the evolution of Web technologies. This session will give some details on what has already happened in this space and what the plans are for the future.

Markus Gylling, IDPF; Ivan Herman, W3C
12:00–12:50
Gold I + II

Pixel Imperfect: Working with Responsive Content

Responsive Design is a paradigm shift for designers and editorial, and many struggle with making the jump. Reconnecting design with editorial without an intermediate developer-controlled layer is a part of making the process work.
HTML5 is a bit of a no-brainer — it can be delivered through hybrid apps, wrapped up into EPUB3, go directly to the mobile web, etc etc. The real problem is workflow — how do publishers actually create all that HTML5, without starting from scratch? Most of their existing content is unstructured, so traditional web templating doesn’t do the trick, or at least not without a lot of copy and paste into forms.The copy and paste approach turns your creative editorial staff into data entry monkeys, and any fan of Jef Raskin and the “humane interface” knows this is neither optimal, nor efficient. Plus, to get great results with rich content, you still have to design “around” the content, not just squirt it through preprepared templates. What’s the answer? We’ll explore what our speakers have been working on, including techniques such as responsive micro-templating, generating single-use structure on the fly, and adding unobtrusive semantics.And we’ll open the floor to the audience to share their own experiences adapting to responsive design.

Michael Kowalski, Contentment; Michael Cairns, Publishing Technology
12:00–12:50
Gold III

Where is Educational Publishing (K-12) Heading and Is the Direction Compliant with Customers and Users? Presented by Schilling A/S

Everyone agree that digitisation provides a lot of opportunities to education. The possibilities of differentiation and customisation of learning methods that meet the needs of the individual student have improved with the use of video, sound and interactivity in general. But the question is whether traditional educational publishers have the right skills to utilise these possibilities? Or are there new players better equipped to create the right digital solutions for teachers and students?

We have invited John Paul Barker, Head of Rygaard International Secondary School in Denmark, and Kami Thordarson, Innovative Strategies Coach at Los Altos School District in California, to explain what they see as the biggest potential for digital teaching resources and if the publishers, from whom they have bought school books for years, are able to fulfil that potential. Kami and John both have strong feelings about teaching in general and about digital possibilities and pitfalls in particular. We’ll hear what they expect from educational publishers in a world of digital teaching.But we are of course also going to hear what the publishers say. Do they feel confident with the possibilities that digitisation provides and how does it affect them? Will they be able to expand their didactic focus to embrace technology in addition? How do they plan to retain their role as important content providers to teachers and students?

Anja Hagen, Cornelsen; Kami Thordarson, Los Altos School District; John Paul Barker, Rygaard Int’l Secondary School; Salla Vaino, Sanoma Pro; moderated by Jakob Larsen, Schilling A/S
14:00–14:50
Platinum I

TISP presents: Business Models for eBook Distribution, Interoperability and Opportunities in Multilingual Europe

Market figures related to digital publishing are in full growth; in European marketplace, made rich by differences of culture and language, new solutions are raising at national level that offer a new perspective for alliances between the various operators of the book value chain and IT providers. In this framework, solutions based on interoperability show many advantages and can open new paths to ebook distribution matching the readers’ needs.

Starting from latest research on status and opportunities of interoperability in the book sector, the session will get close to most recent business experiences and projects conceived and launched in the Old Continent where partnerships between booksellers and Telecom operators propose and European answer to the challenges of e-distribution.

Christoph Bläsi, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz; Vincent Piccolo, La Martinière; NN, Tolino Project; moderated by Cristina Mussinelli, AIE and Patrice Chazerand, DIGITALEUROPE
14:00–14:50
Platinum II

Supply Chain Track — Building a More Accessible Book Market

Market figures related to digital publishing are in full growth; in European marketplace, made rich by differences of culture and language, new solutions are raising at national level that offer a new perspective for alliances between the various operators of the book value chain and IT providers. In this framework, solutions based on interoperability show many advantages and can open new paths to ebook distribution matching the readers’ needs.

Starting from latest research on status and opportunities of interoperability in the book sector, the session will get close to most recent business experiences and projects conceived and launched in the Old Continent where partnerships between booksellers and Telecom operators propose and European answer to the challenges of e-distribution.

Globally, only a tiny proportion of books are accessible to print-impaired readers — for example blind and partially-sighted readers, or those with dyslexia or physical impairments. Some countries have enacted legal copyright exceptions to enable simpler third-party conversions of inaccessible print and e-books into more accessible formats. And some have legal accessibility requirements, particularly for educational publications. But these exceptions and requirements are not universal. This year, the World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO) meeting in Marrakesh agreed the text of a treaty intended to ensure uniform provision is made in all countries – the introduction of a standard set of limitations and exceptions to copyright for people with print impairment, and permissions to exchange specifically accessible formats across borders.

Jens Bammel, General Secretary of the International Publishers Association, will discuss the practical implications of the Marrakesh treaty, the timetable for its implementation, and what this means for publishers.

Shilpi Kapoor is Founder and director of BarrierBreak Technologies, a leading accessibility and assistive technology company in India. BarrierBreak works with leading universities, colleges and libraries worldwide, and in the last year alone, has converted 1.5 million pages of textbooks and documents into accessible formats. The business case is the main focus at BarrierBreak – where do the opportunities lie in making content accessible, and what is the return on investment.

Chairwoman Sarah Hilderley of EDItEUR has worked extensively with publishers to encourage greater emphasis on accessibility from the beginning of the publishing workflow.

Jens Bammel, IPA; Nicolass Faasen, editor & writer; Shilpi Kapoor, BarrierBreak Technologies; moderated by Sarah Hilderley, EDItEUR
14:00–14:50
Alabaster I + II

Libraries and the Mainstream Media Experience: Challenges and Opportunities

Over the past two decades, a tremendous gap has emerged between the media experiences delivered by consumer companies like Amazon, Netflix and Apple and those delivered by the library. The ever-improving consumer media experience is the biggest competitor to the role of the library in the future. 94% of Americans think libraries are an important part of their communities, yet only a fraction engage with the library for digital content services. Can this potential be actualized by creating world class media experiences delivered by the library? Is it feasible that these services could compete with consumer digital companies in the private sector? How would this change the balance of power in the media world and would it better insure democratized access to content? How are public and academic libraries thinking about this globally and what are the cultural and practical challenges to making it happen?Hear leaders from the library world discuss these issues and gain new insights into the future of libraries in the modern digital ecosystem.

Jill Cousins, Europeana Foundation; Mitchell Davis, Bibliolabs; Heather McCormack, 3M; Frances Pinter; Knowledge Unlatched
14:00–14:50
Gold I + II

Creating Change within Physical Publishing

Most of the publicity about new innovations and explorations in publishing focuses on the product, especially digital product. But, important as that is, are there really no other areas that we should be trying to improve? Given that print remains by far the largest part of our industry, can we not improve the way we create and deliver that to our customers? In this session, our speakers will discuss new tools and systems for:

• Production: improving the authoring-to-publishing flow for straightforward narrative content
• Editorial: e.g. working on tools to make editors’ lives better by helping them collaborate and become more efficient with their proofs

Charles Catton, Amber Books; John Pettigrew, Cambridge Publishing Solutions; Sheila Bounford, Off the Page Ideas; Alon Melchner, Waking App
15:20–16:10
Platinum I

The Next Chapter: How Technology is Redefining the Publishing Industry

Digital storytelling requires a new way of doing business, and in some respects, we’re making it up as we go along. Sitting around the negotiations table over a property looks a lot different today than it did the years ago. Lawyers and agents start with a contract that’s founded in “”books”” yet have to envision the business potential for something that is not a “”book””. We’re redefining who creates, owns, pays for, licenses, and sells various components — the rules are changing.

But is it just the same process seen through different glasses?

In this panel, Nathan Hull leads a group representing a number of overlapping – and sometimes conflicting interests: publisher, agent, startup, etc. — in an exploration of this ways doing things digitally is affecting the art, craft and business of publishing.

Nathan Hull, Penguin UK; others tba
15:20–16:10
Platinum II

Supply Chain Track — Trending Topics

Frances Pinter, Knowledge Unlatched, will look at ‘open access’ business models — common for many years in the academic journals sector, but now extending into the academic book market. How can open access provide a win-win for authors, publishers, libraries and readers?

Yoichi Kimata and Hirohisa Ishikawa of the Japan Publishing Organisation for Information Infrastructure Development describe the development of the JPO’s Forward Book Information Center, a hub for book metadata that’s transforming the effectiveness of new book sell-in in Japan.

Howard Willows, Nielsen Book, provides an update on Thema, the new global subject classification scheme for the book trade, which was announced at Tools of Change Frankfurt in 2012. BIC or BISAC, CLIL, WGS, or CCE — Thema aims over time to reduce the need to use these many different nationally-based subject classifications.

Christer Perslov of Bokrondellen discusses the experience of migration from ONIX 2.1 to ONIX 3.0 across Sweden’s book supply chain. How best to manage the switch from a well-established metadata format to its successor, with many data suppliers and many data customers, while avoiding the problems of a ‘big bang’ approach.

Frances Pinter, Knowledge Unlatched; Yoichi Kimata & Hirohisa Ishikawa, JPOIID; Howard Williams, Nielsen Book; Christer Perslov, Bokrondellen; tba; moderated by Graham Bell, EDItEUR
15:20–17:30
Alabaster I + II

Interactive Learning Lab — Self-Publishing and Its Implications for the Industry

Self-publishing is disrupting the publishing industry. In this special 2- hour session, you’ll hear from a variety of leaders in the self- and traditional publishing worlds as they discuss the implications of self-publishing for the traditional market. A few of the issues to be covered:

• the idea of “demonstrating real value — both monetary (via better royalties) and service-oriented — to your authors is something many publishers (some more than others) will be in a lot of trouble if they can’t do. Self-pub options are getting a lot more lucrative on both counts.

• The effect of self-published titles on traditional published title pricing.

• Blurring the lines — can/shoud traditional publishers offer self-publishing services?

• What can traditional publishers learn from crowd-sourcing? Is it a good way to find new authors/grow support for your existing authors?

Porter Anderson, The Ether; Peter Armstrong, LeanPub; Amanda Barbara, Pubslush; Hugh Howey, author; Matthias Matting, researcher; Kristin Nelson, Nelson Literary Agency; Jonny Geller, Curtis Brown; Jon Fine, Amazon; Michael Tamblyn, Kobo; Dr. Florian Geuppert, BoD GmbH
15:20–17:30
Gold I + II

Interactive Learning Lab — The Future of Academic, Scholarly and Higher Ed Publishing

This 2-hour dedicated and highly interactive session will examine the implications of the highly disruptive higher ed and academic publishing segment. From digital textbooks, to Open Access, to membership-based scholarly publishing models, to MOOCs and more — our international panel will discuss how technology tools and services are changing the higher ed, scholarly and academic publishing landscape world wide — taking a close look at whether all these changes to are good for business, and whether they’re good for the actual process of sharing and learning information.

Hedva Vital, Marathon Group; Jan Reichelt, Mendeley/Elsevier; Udi Chatow, Hewlett Packard; Melissa Fulkerson, Elsevier Science &amp Technology Books; Simon Worthington & Mercedes Bunz, Hybrid Publishing Lab at Leuphana University
16:40–17:30
Platinum I

Publishing Partnerships: Publishers, Startups and Technology Companies Working Together

In this session, start ups, technology companies, and publishers who have joined forces share their stories and discuss how such partnerships can result in powerful platforms that can compete with the likes of Amazon and other market share gorillas.

Justo Hidalgo, 24symbols; Javier Celaya, Dosdoce; Richard Nash, Small Demons
16:40–17:30
Platinum II

Supply Chain Track — Raising the Game in the Rights Data Supply Chain

The infrastructure necessary for the effective management of rights and licensing online is falling into place, from publishers rights management systems, through the development of standards and protocols for data sharing, to customer facing marketplace systems. What are the requirements that publishers need to meet in this rapidly developing space, and how do they need to respond? Three speakers with an enormous depth of expertise will address this topic.

Bob Kasher of iviago will talk about the practical challenges and opportunities in implementing rights management systems in multi-divisional, multi-national publishing organisations seeking to automate and rationalise their rights and licensing processes — and how smaller publishers (including self-publishers) can also participate in the market place.

Victoriano Colodrón of Copyright Clearance Center will assess the issues from the other side of the market place — the rights users and licensees — how is the market place developing to meet their requirements, and what are the implications for rightsholders and rights intermediaries in (for example) bundling rights and content?

Godfrey Rust of Rightscom will discuss the data communication, the ‘glue’ which joins rights holders to rights users through rights exchanges, and the experience of the UK in building out its Copyright Hub and the importance of the Linked Content Coalition in breaking down the barriers between different media sectors.

Mark Bide, who is not only the Executive Director of EDItEUR but also the recently appointed the Chairman of the Publishers Licensing Society. Following short presentations from each of the panelists,we anticipate a lively discussion involving members of the audience.

Bob Kasher, iviago; Victoriano Colodron, CCC; Godfrey Rust, Rightscom; moderated by Mark Bide, EDItEUR
17:30–18:00
Platinum I

Startup Showcase Winner and Journalists’ Wrap Up

Our panel of industry journalists highlight the best take-aways from the day and invite attendees to lend a critical voice to the topics and format of CONTEC’s inaugural Frankfurt event.

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