Israeli, Russian Win Best Translated Book Awards in US

In What's the Buzz by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Congratulations! Gail Hareven’s The Confessions of Noa Weber, translated from the Hebrew by Dalya Bilu (Melville House Press) and Elena Fanailova’s The Russian Version, translated from the Russian by Genya and Stephanie Sandler (Ugly Duckling Presse), have won the second annual Best Translated Book Awards for fiction and poetry, respectively. Organized Three Percent at the University of Rochester, the Best …

Google to Scan Rome and Florence Libraries

In Global Trade Talk by Siobhan O'Leary

By Siobhan O’Leary Google’s international march continues, this time straight to Rome. The firm has announced an agreement with the Italian culture ministry to scan up to a million books from the national libraries of Rome and Florence. Similar to its deal with the city of Lyon’s library (covered earlier by Publishing Perspectives), Google will cover the cost of scanning …

Review: The Salt Smugglers by Gérard de Nerval

In Book Review by Gwendolyn Dawson

By Gwendolyn Dawson The Riancey Amendment passed into law in France on July 16, 1850 and imposed a serial novel tax on newspapers, charging one centime per copy of any newspaper that included an installment of a serial novel. The law was based on the belief that serial novels had been responsible for fomenting subversive ideas. Gérard de Nerval’s The …

Berlin Verlag Launches Open Access Academic Press

In German Buch News by Siobhan O'Leary

By Siobhan O’Leary Berlin Verlag plans to launch a new academic division called Berlin Academic. The entire program will be published on a new online platform, a beta version of which will go live this summer, using an open access approach (Creative Commons licenses). The titles will be available via print on demand and in a variety of e-book formats. …

Review: The Confessions of Edward Day by Valerie Martin

In Book Review by Gwendolyn Dawson

By Gwendolyn Dawson Written in the style of an intimate memoir, The Confessions of Edward Day delves into the daily lives of a group of struggling stage actors living in New York City in the 1970s and 1980s. Edward Day is the first person narrator and the undeniable star of this novel. As his career unfolds, we follow Ed through acting school, numerous …

David Foster Wallace Archive to UT Austin

In What's the Buzz by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka It’s probably one of my favorite places on the planet: The Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas at Austin. And it’s just gotten that little bit better, since today it was announced that the Center has acquired the archive of the late David Foster Wallace, author of The Girl with the Curious Hair, Infinite Jest …

Bookish Guide to SXSW

In Hannah's Perspective by Hannah Johnson

By Hannah Johnson I love to recount the story of how Penguin tried to host a panel at the 2009 South by Southwest Interactive conference (SXSW) and how the audience ate the panelists alive with snark via Twitter and accusations about unfair gatekeeping practices (read about it here, here and here). Afterwards, one of the panelists explained the audience-speaker clash …

Could Google (Eventually) Put Translators Out of Business?

In What's the Buzz by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka The New York Times covers Google’s translation technology, which now can translate into 52 different languages. Taking advantage of its immense computing power, the company fed its computers a few hundred billion English words — as compared with an average of one billion words for others — and has far surpassed most other attempts at automated translation. …

Seiler’s Die Zeitwagge Fan Fav at Leipzig Book Fair

In German Buch News by Siobhan O'Leary

By Siobhan O’Leary Online voting for the Leipzig Book Fair Prize has ended and Suhrkamp’s Die Zeitwaage (The Timing Machine) by Lutz Seiler is the crowd favorite with 38% of the vote (read through the book here). Readers had the opportunity to vote for their favorite nominee in the fiction category on the official website of the prize, as well …