Frankfurt on a Shoestring

In Feature Articles by Olivia Snaije

By Olivia Snaije With the Frankfurt Book Fair looming, UK independent publishers hard hit by the economic crisis are trimming and pruning wherever they can for the upcoming Book Fair. While the Book Fair is considered vital, a general trend is that publishers will be sending fewer people to Frankfurt this year. Juliet Mabey, publisher and co-founder of Oneworld based …

Could EC Digitzation Debate Pave the Way for a Competitor to Google?

In Feature Articles by Liz Bury

By Liz Bury LONDON: Deep in the Bodleian Library, the scholarly heart of Oxford University, England, is a locked room emitting, I imagine, a low hum. This is Google’s digitization suite, the control center of its scanning operation at the library, into which no Bodleian staffer may enter. That, at least, is the story doing the rounds among British librarians, …

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Hugo Chávez’s Color Coded “Revolutionary Reading Plan”

In Feature Articles by Emily Williams

By Emily Williams No friend to publishing (see our earlier coverage here) Venezuelan president Hugo Chávez has nevertheless started to implement his four-part color coded “Revolutionary Reading Plan.” Announced in May, the goal of the project as stated by the Venezuelan government, is “the democratization of books and reading, with a new conception of reading as a collective act under …

A Year After the Meltdown, Iceland is Hot

In Feature Articles by Chad W. Post

By Chad W. Post Although Iceland has had some very notable cultural exports — Halldor Laxness, Bjork, and Sigur Ros among them — last fall’s spectacular economic collapse probably brought more attention to this island nation than any other event in its modern history. One year later, the financial sector may still be recovering, but its literary scene is thriving. “Our goal is …

“The Red Tent” Meets “Exodus”

In Feature Articles by Erin L. Cox

By Erin L. Cox NEW YORK: Bestselling author Anita Diamant spent 48 weeks on The New York Times bestseller list with her novel The Red Tent and later won widespread critical acclaim for her follow-up, The Last Days of Dogtown. Her latest novel Day After Night was published earlier this month. It is the fictional account of a group of young …

Bonus Material: Electric Literature’s Intriguing Animations

In Feature Articles by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Electric Literature, the journal edited by Andy Hunter (see today’s main story) is one of very few new literary magazines launched this year in the midst of the economic crisis. The concept behind the magazine is simple: publish five short stories and make them available in a myriad of formats, from paperback print-on-demand to Kindle. Issue #1 …

Dissidents and Officials Face Off at Frankfurt Book Fair’s China Symposium

In Feature Articles by Hannah Johnson

By Hannah Johnson FRANKFURT: A crowd of journalists swarmed around two slightly overwhelmed people on Saturday morning, September 12th at the Instituto Cervantes (the Spanish Cultural Institute) in Frankfurt, Germany. Chinese dissidents Bei Ling (貝嶺), a poet and journal editor, and Dai Qing (戴晴), an investigative journalist, had come to attend the much anticipated symposium, “China and the World – …

China Offers Ample Opportunities, Despite Global Gloom, Say Publishers

In Feature Articles by Guest Contributor

By Xing Daiqi BEIJING: The slogan of this week’s 16th Beijing International Book Fair (BIBF) is “To see what the world is reading.” But with China’s position as the engine of the global economy reinforced under the present financial crisis, the world is increasingly curious about what China is reading. Still, in spite of the economic downturn, more than half …