Let’s Go to the Mall (For a Book Fair)

In Feature Articles by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka AL AIN: In the United Arab Emirates book fairs have traditionally been held outdoors in what amount to open air bazaars, so in 2006 when the Abu Dhabi International Book Fair was moved indoors to the city’s new high tech exhibition hall, it was a break from the norm. Today, KITAB — the organization responsible for the …

French Women Just Aren’t Into It (Self Help, That Is)

In Feature Articles by Guest Contributor

By Debra Ollivier When the American self-help mega bestseller He’s Just Not That Into You was published in France last year, co-author Liz Tuccillo made a shocking discovery: French Women Just Weren’t That Into Her Book. France was the last Western country to buy the rights to her book, and when it was published in French, few seemed to care …

How to Turn Video Gamers into Readers (Millions at a Time)

In Feature Articles by Siobhan O'Leary

By Siobhan O’Leary BERLIN: It might seem counterintuitive for a video game company to set up shop in a bookstore, but as we reported last month, Nintendo Germany has now established its own 40 sq. meter “shop within a shop” in the Mayersche Buchhandlung in Cologne. They have been selling consoles at the bookstore (and at German book chain Hugendubel) …

Frankfurt on a Shoestring

In Feature Articles by Olivia Snaije

By Olivia Snaije With the Frankfurt Book Fair looming, UK independent publishers hard hit by the economic crisis are trimming and pruning wherever they can for the upcoming Book Fair. While the Book Fair is considered vital, a general trend is that publishers will be sending fewer people to Frankfurt this year. Juliet Mabey, publisher and co-founder of Oneworld based …

Could EC Digitzation Debate Pave the Way for a Competitor to Google?

In Feature Articles by Liz Bury

By Liz Bury LONDON: Deep in the Bodleian Library, the scholarly heart of Oxford University, England, is a locked room emitting, I imagine, a low hum. This is Google’s digitization suite, the control center of its scanning operation at the library, into which no Bodleian staffer may enter. That, at least, is the story doing the rounds among British librarians, …

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Hugo Chávez’s Color Coded “Revolutionary Reading Plan”

In Feature Articles by Emily Williams

By Emily Williams No friend to publishing (see our earlier coverage here) Venezuelan president Hugo Chávez has nevertheless started to implement his four-part color coded “Revolutionary Reading Plan.” Announced in May, the goal of the project as stated by the Venezuelan government, is “the democratization of books and reading, with a new conception of reading as a collective act under …

A Year After the Meltdown, Iceland is Hot

In Feature Articles by Chad W. Post

By Chad W. Post Although Iceland has had some very notable cultural exports — Halldor Laxness, Bjork, and Sigur Ros among them — last fall’s spectacular economic collapse probably brought more attention to this island nation than any other event in its modern history. One year later, the financial sector may still be recovering, but its literary scene is thriving. “Our goal is …

“The Red Tent” Meets “Exodus”

In Feature Articles by Erin L. Cox

By Erin L. Cox NEW YORK: Bestselling author Anita Diamant spent 48 weeks on The New York Times bestseller list with her novel The Red Tent and later won widespread critical acclaim for her follow-up, The Last Days of Dogtown. Her latest novel Day After Night was published earlier this month. It is the fictional account of a group of young …

Bonus Material: Electric Literature’s Intriguing Animations

In Feature Articles by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Electric Literature, the journal edited by Andy Hunter (see today’s main story) is one of very few new literary magazines launched this year in the midst of the economic crisis. The concept behind the magazine is simple: publish five short stories and make them available in a myriad of formats, from paperback print-on-demand to Kindle. Issue #1 …