Awards: AAP Names Its 2022 PROSE Awards Finalists and Category Winners

In Feature Articles by Porter Anderson

The 2022 PROSE Awards from the Association of American Publishers this year have 106 finalists and 39 subject category winners.

At the Bibliotheca Alexandria, the modern Library at Alexandria, the sixth-largest francophone library in the world. Image, November 24, 2021 – Getty iStockphoto: Ron Odenthal

By Porter Anderson, Editor-in-Chief | @Porter_Anderson

Drawn From a Pool of 560 Submissions
Those who follow world publishing’s myriad prizes and book awards know that the annual PROSE Awards from the Association of American Publishers (AAP) are a very big program.

These honors for “professional and scholarly excellence”—the source of the acronym PROSE—are now in their 46th iteration.

And while they’re focused on academic and scholarly publishing, what they have in common with the Wattys, the Audies, and the Nibbies is that they showcase an enormous body of valuable content.

The PROSE Awards are huge:

  • This year, there are 106 finalists
  • There are 39 category winners
  • There was a starting pool of at least 560 entries
  • And the whole program has been handled by 24 jurors

Those jurors this year include many familiar faces. Here are Peter Berkery, executive director of the Association of University Presses; Deborah Logan, who heads up Elsevier’s energy and earth science journals; Nigel Fletcher-Jones, of the American University in Cairo Press; Bloomsbury Academic’s senior editor Katie Gallof; Stanford University Press’ humanities lead Erica Wetter; and Maureen “Shawn” Kennedy, editor-in-chief of the American Journal of Nursing—and at a time when health-care workers are leaving the field in record numbers under the brunt of the still-ongoing coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic, Kennedy’s journal is one covering both heroism and extraordinary strain.

What we have today (January 25) is a combined list of both the 39 subject categories’ winners and finalists.

After today’s announcement of the 106 finalists and the 39 category winners, the top contenders will be named in four super-categories to receive “Awards for Excellence“:

  • Biological and Life Sciences
  • Humanities
  • Physical Sciences and Mathematics
  • Social Sciences

Update, January 26: Perceptive readers will notice that a fifth super-category, Reference, is not included this year.

In answer to Publishing Perspectives‘ inquiry, we have this explanation from the AAP team, emphasis theirs:

“The 2022 PROSE Awards of all types–including reference works, journals, digital products, monographs, etc.–were assessed first by the subject area as part of a drive to make ‘contribution to the subject area’ and/or ‘ease of use or utility’ ‘the most important judging criteria, regardless of the method of delivery. This resulted in an interesting reshuffling of categories.

“In one subject area, Physical Sciences and Mathematics, for example, a monograph, a journal, and a reference work were the three finalists, and reference works and journals also appeared elsewhere among the finalists.

“The result was that some extraordinary reference works ended up being recognized in other categories, including Engineering and Technology, Environmental Science, and Biological Anthropology, Archaeology and Ancient History, rather than in Reference–in the process eliminating the need for the separate Reference category in this year’s awards.”

Once the four super-category winners are named, they go into competition for the top PROSE recognition, the R.R. Hawkins Award, which is normally celebrated during the AAP’s annual meeting in June.

Swann: ‘Every Conceivable Area of Study’

Syreeta Swann

In a prepared statement on today’s announcement, Syreeta Swann, AAP’s COO, is quoted, saying, “This year’s PROSE Award entries overwhelmingly raised the bar in quality, content, and diversity, reflecting the profound expertise that goes into creating scholarly publications in every conceivable area of study.

“We’re pleased to announce that our panel of 24 judges has reviewed more than 560 entries, in the process singling out 106 titles to be honored as finalists. From this list, our judges then identified 39 outstanding titles to be honored as category winners.”

Nigel Fletcher-Jones

And Fletcher-Jones, the chief juror of the group, says, “Despite all the trials and tribulations of the last year, the standard of entries has been universally high.

“This led to very close competition in almost all subject areas and will lead no doubt to stiff competition among the ‘Awards for Excellence’ nominees.”

Last year, Simon Martin’s Ancient Maya Politics: A Political Anthropology of the Classic Period 150–900 CE from Cambridge University Press was the winner of the 2021 RR Hawkins Award.

Category 1 of 4: Biological and Life Sciences

Biological Sciences

Category Winner

  • Ant Architecture, Walter R. Tschinkel, Princeton University Press 

Finalists

  • Exuberant Life: An Evolutionary Approach to Conservation in Galapagos, William H. Durham, Oxford University Press
  • The Evolution of Social Behaviour, Michael Taborsky , Michael A. Cant , and Jan Komdeur, Cambridge University Press 

Biomedicine

Category Winner

  • Of Sound Mind: How Our Brain Constructs a Meaningful Sonic World, Nina Kraus, The MIT Press

Finalist

  • The Spike: An Epic Journey Through the Brain in 2.1 Seconds, Mark Humphries, Princeton University Press

Clinical Medicine

Category Winner

  • Global Health Security: A Blueprint for the Future, Lawrence O. Gostin, Harvard University Press

Finalists

  • Neuroscience for Clinicians: Basic Processes, Circuits, Disease Mechanisms, and Therapeutic Implications, Eduardo E. Benarroch, Oxford University Press
  • Trans Medicine: The Emergence and Practice of Treating Gender, Stef M. Shuster, NYU Press 

Neuroscience

Category Winner

  • Conscious Mind, Resonant Brain: How Each Brain Makes a Mind, Stephen Grossberg, Oxford University Press

Finalists

  • The Secret Body: How the New Science of the Human Body Is Changing the Way We Live, Daniel M. Davis, Princeton University Press 

Nursing and Allied Health

Category Winner

  • Advanced Physiology and Pathophysiology: Essentials for Clinical Practice, Nancy Tkacs, PhD, RN; Linda Herrmann, PhD, RN, ACHPN, AGACNP-BC, GNP-BC, FAANP; and Randall Johnson, PhD, RN, Springer Publishing Company

Finalists

  • Communication and Care Coordination for the Palliative Care Team, Rebecca S. Imes, PhD; Leah M. Omilion-Hodges PhD; and Jennifer Hester DNP, ACHPN, AOCNS, Springer Publishing Company
  • Newman and Carranza’s Clinical Periodontology for the Dental Hygienist, Michael G. Newman, Lory Laughter, Gwendolyn Essex, and Satheesh Elangovan, Elsevier, Inc. 

Clinical Psychology & Psychiatry

Category Winner

  • Undoing Aloneness and the Transformation of Suffering into Flourishing: AEDP 2.0, Edited by Diana Fosha, American Psychological Association 
Category 2 of 4: Humanities 

Art Exhibitions

Category Winner

  • Cézanne Drawing, Jodi Hauptman and Samantha Friedman, The Museum of Modern Art 

Finalists

  • Georgia O’Keeffe, Photographer, Lisa Volpe, Yale University Press
  • Holbein: Capturing Character, Edited by Anne T. Woollett, with contributions by Austėja Mackelaitė, John T. McQuillen, and others, J. Paul Getty Museum

Art History & Criticism

Category Winner

  • Women Artists, Their Patrons, and Their Publics in Early Modern Bologna, Babette Bohn, Penn State University Press

Finalists

  • Communicating Knowledge Visually:  Will Burtin’s Scientific Approach to Information Design, R. Roger Remington and Sheila Pontis, Ph.D., RIT Press
  • Venus and the Arts of Love in Renaissance Florence, Rebekah Compton, Cambridge University Press 

Biography & Autobiography

Category Winner

  • Eunice Hunton Carter: A Lifelong Fight for Social Justice, Marilyn S. Greenwald and Yun Li, Fordham University Press

Finalists

  • The Black President, Claude A. Clegg III, Johns Hopkins University Press
  • Bright Galaxies, Dark Matter, and Beyond: The Life of Astronomer Vera Rubin, Ashley Jean Yeager, The MIT Press 

Biological Anthropology, Ancient History & Archaeology

Category Winner

  • Julius Caesar and the Roman People, Robert Morstein-Marx, Cambridge University Press 

Finalists

  • A Handbook of Gods and Goddesses of the Ancient Near East: Three Thousand Deities of Anatolia, Syria, Israel, Sumer, Babylonia, Assyria, and Elam, Douglas R. Frayne and Johanna H. Stuckey, with illustrations by Stéphane Beaulieu, Penn State University Press
  • Evolutionary Human Sciences, Professor Ruth Mace, Cambridge University Press 

Classics

Category Winner

  • Tragic Bodies: Edges of the Human in Greek Drama, Nancy Worman, Bloomsbury

Finalist

  • The Ancient Greek Roots of Human Rights, Rachel Hall Sternberg, University of Texas Press 

European History

Category Winner

  • An Infinite History: The Story of a Family in France Over Three Centuries, Emma Rothschild, Princeton University Press

Finalist

  • When France Fell: The Vichy Crisis and the Fate of the Anglo-American Alliance, Michael S. Neiberg, Harvard University Press

Language & Linguistics

Category Winner

  • Transgender Identities in the Press: A Corpus-based Discourse Analysis, Angela Zottola, Bloomsbury

Finalist

  • Storytelling and Ecology: Empathy, Enchantment and Emergence in the Use of Oral Narratives, Anthony Nanson, Bloomsbury 

Literature

Category Winner

  • Read Until You Understand: The Profound Wisdom of Black Life and Literature, Farah Jasmine Griffin, W. W. Norton & Company

Finalists

  • The Quick and the Dead: Selected Stories, Mairtin O Cadhain; Translated from the Irish; Introduction by Louis de Paor, Yale University Press
  • The Other Side of Terror: Black Women and the Culture of US Empire, Erica R. Edwards, New York University Press
  • The Idea of Europe: A Critical History, Shane Weller, Cambridge University Press 

Media and Cultural Studies

Category Winner

  • Empire of Ruins: American Culture, Photography, and the Spectacle of Destruction, Miles Orvell, Oxford University Press 

Finalists

  • Blackface, Ayanna Thompson, Bloomsbury
  • Red Lines: Political Cartoons and the Struggle against Censorship, Cherian George and Sonny Liew, The MIT Press

Music & the Performing Arts

Category Winner

  • Liner Notes for the Revolution: The Intellectual Life of Black Feminist Sound, Daphne A. Brooks, The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press

Finalists

  • Soundtrack to a Movement African American Islam, Jazz, and Black Internationalism, Richard Brent Turner, NYU Press 

Nonfiction Graphic Novels

Category Winner

  • The King of Bangkok, Claudio Sopranzetti, Sara Fabbri, and Chiara Natalucci, University of Toronto Press

Finalists

  • Red Lines: Political Cartoons and the Struggle against Censorship, Cherian George and Sonny Liew, The MIT Press
  • Hakim’s Odyssey, Book 1: From Syria to Turkey, Fabien Toulmé, Graphic Mundi / Penn State University Press 

North American History

Category Winner

  • Traveling Black: A Story of Race and Resistance, Mia Bay, The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press

Finalists

  • Paper Trails: The US Post and the Making of the American West, Cameron Blevins, Oxford University Press
  • Intimate Integration: A History of the Sixties Scoop and the Colonization of Indigenous Kinship, Allyson Stevenson, University of Toronto Press 

Outstanding Works by a Trade Publisher

Category Winner

  • Cuba: An American History, Ada Ferrer, Scribner 

Finalists

  • How Rights Went Wrong, Jamal Greene, Mariner Books, an imprint of HarperCollins
  • Halfway Home: Race, Punishment, and the Afterlife of Mass Incarceration, Reuben Miller, Little Brown and Company 

Philosophy

Category Winner

  • Hegel’s Century: Alienation and Recognition in a Time of Revolution, Jon Stewart, Cambridge University Press

Finalists

  • One Over Many: The Unitary Pluralism of Plato’s World, Necip Fikri Alican, SUNY Press
  • A Companion to Chomsky, Nicholas Allott, Terje Lohndal, and Georges Rey, John Wiley & Sons 

Theology & Religious Studies

Category Winner

  • Jews and the Qur’an, Meir M. Bar-Asher, Foreword by Mustafa Akyol, Translated by Ethan Rundell, Princeton University Press 

Finalists

  • Introduction to the Apocrypha: Jewish Books in Christian Bibles, Lawrence M. Wills, Yale University Press
  • When the Medium Was the Mission: The Atlantic Telegraph and the Religious Origins of Network Culture, Jenna Supp-Montgomerie, New York University Press 

World History

Category Winner

  • Experiments in Skin: Race and Beauty in the Shadows of Vietnam, Thuy Linh Nguyen Tu, Duke University Press

Finalists

  • The Horde: How the Mongols Changed the World, Marie Favereau, The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press
  • The Armenians of Aintab: The Economics of Genocide in an Ottoman Province, Ümit Kurt, Harvard University Press 
Category 3 of 4: Physical Sciences and Mathematics 

Chemistry/Physics

Category Winner

Introduction to Effective Field Theory: Thinking Effectively about Hierarchies of Scale, C. P. Burgess, Cambridge University Press

Finalists

  • Modern Classical Mechanics, T. M. Helliwell and V. V. Sahakian, Cambridge University Press
  • Quantum Field Theory: A Diagrammatic Approach, Ronald Kleiss, Cambridge University Press

Computing & Information Sciences

Category Winner

  • Deep Learning in Science, Pierre Baldi, Cambridge University Press

Finalists

  • The Essence of Software: Why Concepts Matter for Great Design, Daniel Jackson, Princeton University Press
  • Compressive Imaging: Structure, Sampling, Learning, Ben Adcock and Anders C. Hansen, Cambridge University Press 

Earth Science

Category Winner

  • When the Sahara Was Green: How Our Greatest Desert Came to Be, Martin Williams, Princeton University Press 

Finalists

  • Seismic Hazard and Risk Analysis, Jack Baker, Brendon Bradley, and Peter Stafford, Cambridge University Press

Engineering & Technology

Category Winner

  • Atlas of Forecasts: Modeling and Mapping Desirable Futures, Katy Börner, The MIT Press

Finalists

  • Things Fall Together: A Guide to the New Materials Revolution, Skylar Tibbits, Princeton University Press
  • Biofluid Mechanics: Analysis and Applications, James B. Grotberg, Cambridge University Press 

Environmental Science

Category Winner

  • One Earth, Edited by Lewis Collins, Shanshan Zhang, and Abel Barral Cuesta, Cell Press

Finalists

  • Planetary Health: Safeguarding Human Health and the Environment in the Anthropocene, Andy Haines and Howard Frumkin, Cambridge University Press
  • The Fight for Climate After COVID-19, Alice C. Hill, Oxford University Press 

History of Science, Medicine, and Technology

Category Winner

  • Plagues Upon the Earth: Disease and the Curse of Human History, Kyle Harper, Princeton University Press

Finalists

  • Mind, State, and Society: Social History of Psychiatry and Mental Health in Britain 1960-2010, Edited by George Ikkos and Nick Bouras, Cambridge University Press
  • Grand Transitions: How the Modern World Was Made, Vaclav Smil, Oxford University Press 

Innovation in Journal Publishing

Category Winner

  • Rapid Reviews: COVID-19, Stefano M. Bertozzi, The MIT Press 

Mathematics

Category Winner

  • Equivariant Stable Homotopy Theory and the Kervaire Invariant Problem, Michael A. Hill, Michael J. Hopkins, and Douglas C. Ravenel, Cambridge University Press

Finalists

  • The Discrete Mathematical Charms of Paul Erdfős: A Simple Introduction, Vašek Chvátal, Cambridge University Press
  • Origametry: Mathematical Methods in Paper Folding, Thomas C. Hull, Cambridge University Press
  • Visual Differential Geometry and Forms: A Mathematical Drama in Five Acts, Tristan Needham, Princeton University Press

Popular Science/Math

Category Winner

  • Do Not Erase: Mathematicians and Their Chalkboards, Jessica Wynne, Princeton University Press 

Finalists

  • Spark: The Life of Electricity and the Electricity of Life, Timothy J. Jorgensen, Princeton University Press
  • Quick(er) Calculations, Trevor Davis Lipscombe, Oxford University Press 
Category 4 of 4: Social Sciences 

Architecture and Urban Planning

Category Winner

  • Building Antebellum New Orleans: Free People of Color and Their Influence, Tara A. Dudley, University of Texas Press

Finalists

  • The Metropolis in Latin America, 1830–1930: Cityscapes, Photographs, Debates, Edited by Idurre Alonso and Maristella Casciato, Getty Research Institute
  • Modernity for the Masses: Antonio Bonet’s Dreams for Buenos Aires, Ana María León, University of Texas Press 

Business, Finance & Management

Category Winner

  • Management as a Calling: Leading Business, Serving Society, Andrew J. Hoffman, Stanford University Press

Finalists

  • Ultimate Gig, John T. Fleming and Lauren Lawley Head, Emerald Publishing 

Cultural Anthropology & Sociology

Category Winner

  • Halfway Home: Race, Punishment, and the Afterlife of Mass Incarceration, Reuben Miller, Little, Brown and Company

Finalists

  • American Afterlives: Reinventing Death in the Twenty-First Century, Shannon Lee Dawdy, Princeton University Press
  • Up to Heaven and Down to Hell: Fracking, Freedom, and Community in an American Town, Colin Jerolmack, Princeton University Press 

Economics

Category Winner

  • How We Give Now: A Philanthropic Guide for the Rest of Us, Lucy Bernholz, The MIT Press

Finalist

  • The Future of Money: How the Digital Revolution Is Transforming Currencies and Finance, Eswar S. Prasad, Harvard University Press 

Education Practice & Theory

Category Winner

  • A Search for Common Ground: Conversations About the Toughest Questions in K–12 Education, Frederick M. Hess and Pedro A. Noguera, Teachers College Press

Finalists

  • How We Read Now: Strategic Choices for Print, Screen, and Audio, Naomi S. Baron, Oxford University Press
  • Black, Brown, Bruised: How Racialized STEM Education Stifles Innovation, Ebony Omotola McGee, Harvard Education Press

Government & Politics

Category Winner

  • A World Without Soil: The Past, Present, and Precarious Future of the Earth Beneath Our Feet, Jo Handelsman, Yale University Press

Finalists

  • Shari‘a, Inshallah: Finding God in Somali Legal Politics, Mark Fathi Massoud, Cambridge University Press
  • Political Science Is for Everybody: An Introduction to Political Science, Amy L. Atchison, University of Toronto Press 

Legal Studies and Criminology

Category Winner

  • A Constitution for the Living: Imagining How Five Generations of Americans Would Rewrite the Nation’s Fundamental Law, Beau Breslin, Stanford University Press

Finalists

  • A Pattern of Violence: How the Law Classifies Crimes and What It Means for Justice, David Alan Sklansky, Harvard University Press
  • The Behavioral Code: The Hidden Ways the Law Makes Us Better or Worse, Benjamin van Rooij and Adam Fine, Beacon Press

Psychology and Applied Social Work

Category Winner

  • Roma Minority Youth Across Cultural Contexts: Taking a Positive Approach to Research, Policy, and Practice, Radosveta Dimitrova, David Lackland Sam, and Laura Ferrer Wreder, Oxford University Press 

Finalists

  • The Intellectual Lives of Children, Susan Engel, Harvard University Press
  • Generation Disaster: Coming of Age Post-9/11, Karla Vermeulen, Oxford University Press

More from Publishing Perspectives on the Association of American Publishers is here, more on digital publishing is here, and more on publishing and book awards is here.

More from us on the coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on international book publishing is here.

About the Author

Porter Anderson

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Porter Anderson is a non-resident fellow of Trends Research & Advisory, and he has been named International Trade Press Journalist of the Year in London Book Fair's International Excellence Awards. He is Editor-in-Chief of Publishing Perspectives. He formerly was Associate Editor for The FutureBook at London's The Bookseller. Anderson was for more than a decade a senior producer and anchor with CNN.com, CNN International, and CNN USA. As an arts critic (National Critics Institute), he was with The Village Voice, the Dallas Times Herald, and the Tampa Tribune, now the Tampa Bay Times. He co-founded The Hot Sheet, a newsletter for authors, which now is owned and operated by Jane Friedman.