Leipzig’s Voland & Quist Wins IPR License Table at Frankfurt

In News by Porter Anderson

The new Publishers Rights Corner at Frankfurt Book Fair has sold out its original inventory of 20 tables, but a couple of extras have been added for October 18 pre-Fair LitAg meetings.
Frankfurt Buchmesse. Image - iStockphoto: Meinzahn

Frankfurt Buchmesse. Image – iStockphoto: Meinzahn

By Porter Anderson, Editor-in-Chief | @Porter_Anderson

Publishers Rights Corner Is Sold Out
As promised, Frankfurt Book Fair organizers and IPR License are making a quick announcement that the German independent publisher Voland & Quist has won the free IPR-sponsored table in Frankfurt’s new Publishers Rights Corner.

Set in Hall 6.3, the new Publishers Rights Corner is adjacent to the sold-out LitAg and is a response to agents’ requests for Tuesday meetings (October 18) at the fairgrounds rather than in the Frankfurter Hof and other hotels. Open only that day, the Publishers Rights Corner will match its hours to those of the LitAg, 9 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.

At this point, Frankfurt reports, more than 100 agencies are holding their Tuesday meetings at the fairgrounds.

As we wrote in April, a very robust sellout of Frankfurt Book Fair’s 2016 Literary Agents and Scouts Centre (LitAg)—and the search for saner meetings on the eve of the trade show in October—has prompted the creation of Publishers Rights Corner (PRC). The deadline for applications was reached Friday (June 17), and the announcement of Voland & Quist’s win has followed.

In a prepared statement from Frankfurt we read:

Voland & Quist logo lined“Based in Leipzig, Voland & Quist has roots that go back to Berlin’s “Lesebühne,” (open mic reading) scene.

“The company also publishes many new voices, including spoken word poets and short story writers, often pairing their books with CDs and DVDs of performances by the authors.

“Over the last 10 years, Voland & Quist has added short stories, novels, graphic novels and children’s books to its catalogue.”

Voland & Quist’s Karina Fenner is quoted as saying: “In addition to our German-language authors we now also acquire world language rights. The PRC will make our work a lot easier. It will enable us to increase our rights business and to network.

“It will also facilitate talks with our international partners, tucked away from the noise and craziness of the regular fair meetings.”

IPR-License 710And speaking for IPR License, which sponsored the raffled table, IPR marketing chief is quoted talking about the new day of meetings on the fairgrounds for rights agents and publishers: “We are really pleased by the response to the table raffle at the Publishers Rights Corner.  This is something new for 2016 and we are thrilled that publishers Voland & Quist will now be able to use this designated area right next to the LitAg for their business meetings as well.  I’m glad IPR License was able to facilitate this.”

The match of IPR to the newly added pre-Fair day of agents’ meetings on October is a good one. With some 500 members listing rights online with IPR, the platform has a large international subscriber base of rights buyers. Last year, rights listings were viewed by publishing houses in 171 countries, comprising 132 languages.

Frankfurt Book Fair holds the controling interest in IPR License, in co-ownership with Copyright Clearance Center.

About the Author

Porter Anderson

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Porter Anderson is a non-resident fellow of Trends Research & Advisory, and he has been named International Trade Press Journalist of the Year in London Book Fair's International Excellence Awards. He is Editor-in-Chief of Publishing Perspectives. He formerly was Associate Editor for The FutureBook at London's The Bookseller. Anderson was for more than a decade a senior producer and anchor with CNN.com, CNN International, and CNN USA. As an arts critic (National Critics Institute), he was with The Village Voice, the Dallas Times Herald, and the Tampa Tribune, now the Tampa Bay Times. He co-founded The Hot Sheet, a newsletter for authors, which now is owned and operated by Jane Friedman.