Does Book Scouting Have a Future?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

*+-By Edward Nawotka As our series on scouting has revealed, having inside information about the hottest books is very valuable to publishers, and scouts have some of the tastiest dish around. That said, digital communication has made the free flow of information about hot books much, well, freer. The risk for scouts is that the wealth and speed of book …

Inside the Secret World of Literary Scouts, Part II

In English Language, Resources by Emily Williams

*+-By Emily Williams Part II: Scouting Changes with the Times NEW YORK: Last week in Part I we looked at the essentials of how scouting works.  Many of these essentials—recognizing a great manuscript when it crosses your desk, cultivating a wide network of close relationships across the industry, understanding your clients’ needs and serving them well—will always remain the same. …

Are Literary Scouts to be Envied?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

*+-By Edward Nawotka In Emily Williams’ continuing series about literary scouting (Part 1 & Part 2), she describes a seemingly mysterious world that seems both quirky and quixotic. As Williams has explained, it is indeed an exotic job, but it is also cut-throat, demanding role that requires constant vigilance over the vagaries of the market. Perhaps no one has summed …

What Have You Done to Get an Early Look at a Book?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

*+-By Edward Nawotka Literary scouts, as discussed in today’s feature article by Emily Williams, like much of those in the publishing industry, work in mysterious ways. For them, as well as for agents, editors, and almost anyone else in the publishing chain, getting the earliest possible read on a book—whether as a proposal or manuscript—is a key part of becoming …