Is Non-linear Reading the Future of Nonfiction E-Reading?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

Non-linear app “reading” is perhaps more analogous to how we really learn than reading a straight narrative. By Edward Nawotka In today’s feature story Kirk Bowe, CTO of UK app developer TradeMobile, explains how the company is attempting to create what amounts to a 3-D narrative on screens. In describing the company’s King and Queens app, developed from David Starkey’s …

Beyond the E-book: Creating a “3-D Narrative” on Screens

In Digital by Guest Contributor

Should publishers simply be transfering the printed page, unaltered, to the screen? No, especially when there is so much more you can do, argues Kirk Bowe, CTO, of UK app developer TradeMobile. Editorial by Kirk Bowe, CTO, TradeMobile LONDON: The e-book is dead. Let’s be clear: with the transition from paper to electronic screens, which are increasingly more often on …

#BEA11: “What’s Next?” A Chance Encounter with Jan Brett

In What's the Buzz by Guest Contributor

By Kathleen Sweeney As a BEA newbie, I hadn’t counted on being starstruck by a children’s book celebrity siting. I was strolling through the Penguin Books pavilion scanning books when there she was, Jan Brett, the author and illustrator extraordinaire, no less than a legend on my daughters’ bookshelves, passing out swag bags emblazoned with her book covers for Home …

Why Bogus Flap Copy Erodes Readers’ Trust

In Editorial & Opinion by Guest Contributor

Using platitudes like “remarkable” and “dazzling” in flap copy is forgivable, but calling a book “funny” when it is anything but is a much worse crime. Editorial by Nico Vreeland Flap copy always lies. It’s sickly understandable, considering the competitive marketplace for books. But, as a reader, it’s intensely frustrating to wade through book descriptions where the truth is more …

Can Books Serve as Cultural Ambassadors to Change the Reputation of a Nation?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

Cultural exports are often described in geopolitical terms as an exercise in “soft power” and book fairs, in particular, provide a forum for developing lasting relationships that are the foundation for change. By Edward Nawotka International book fairs — from Beijing to Buenos Aires (taking place now) to author-centric events like the PEN World Voices Festival — aim in part …

Should Reading Be Promoted as a “Legal Drug”?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka In today’s feature story Shashi Martynova, who is known as one of the most enthusiastic advocates of reading in Russia, suggested that one tactic that could be used to entice a younger generation of readers to pick up books instead of video games or submit to other distractions was to promote reading as “a legal drug.” “Often, …

Can You “Bring Back the Book” to a Country That Can’t Afford to Read?

In Children's, Growth Markets by Guest Contributor

Nigeria’s President launched a campaign to inspire reading that was part-election, part-Facebook festival and part-magical thinking. Editorial by Tolu Ogunlesi LAGOS: Nigeria has no national funding for the arts, no government-run grants-awarding body to support the production of books, and no National Book Policy. In place of a proper publishing industry, the country is awash with book printers, supporting a flourishing …

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A Perfect Example of Video That Could Work for Enhanced E-books (via the UK and Sweden)

In Ed's Perspective by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Video and film is a tricky format, especially for book publishers who are working in the medium. When it comes to “enhancing e-books” publishers need to be careful. The enhancements shouldn’t interrupt the text or repeat it, but offer a lateral view of the subject at hand – a genuine enhancement – rather than the core material …