In the Age of Censorship vs. Instant News, This is When We Need Literature the Most

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka “I believe society has a right to defend itself, just as the individual has the right to attack that with which he disagrees.” — Naguib Mahfouz As discussed in today’s lead story, the mounting revolution in Cairo has shut down the Cairo International Book Fair. Meanwhile, those interested in developments are dependent on impromptu and conventional news …

Is Joe Sacco the World’s Greatest Graphic Noveliest/Reporter? The French Say “Oui”

In What's the Buzz by Olivia Snaije

By Olivia Snaije The Maltese-born American cartoonist and journalist Joe Sacco has just won the public news radio station France Info’s 2011 news and comic book prize for the French edition of his 400-page graphic novel Footnotes in Gaza. This is the second time Sacco has won the France Info prize—he was awarded the prize in 1999 for his graphic novel …

Arabic, Persian, Turkish, Urdu…Who Knew?: Words Without Borders’ Surprise Hit

In Growth Markets by Chip Rossetti

By Chip Rossetti Last fall marked the release of Tablet & Pen: Literary Landscapes from the Modern Middle East, an anthology of modern Middle Eastern literature in translation that has had a surprising success in the American market. Tablet & Pen represents a fruitful collaboration between the literature-in-translation online magazine Words Without Borders and anthology editor Reza Aslan, author of …

Best of Publishing Perspectives 2010: Middle East and China

In Growth Markets by Hannah Johnson

Markets like China and others in the Middle East have shown that they have huge capacity for growth and can offer opportunities to Western publishing companies. In order for you to get to know these markets better, here are our top articles on China and the Middle East from 2010. China The E-reader Market in China (And Its Unique Business …

Chair of Judges for the Arabic Booker Discusses the Shortlist

In Arabic Publishing by Olivia Snaije

By Olivia Snaije The shortlist for the International Prize for Arabic Fiction (IPAF) — better known as the Arabic Booker — was released last week; the winner — who receives $50,000 (shortlisted authors receive $10,000 — will be announced March 14, 2011 during the Abu Dhabi Book Fair. The six writers on the shortlist are from Egypt, Morocco, Sudan and …

Penguin Enters Arab Market with Joint Venture

In Arabic Publishing by Hannah Johnson

By Hannah Johnson Pearson PLC announced today that its Penguin Group has launched a joint venture with Egyptian publisher Dar El Shorouk. The “Shorouk-Penguin project” will translate into Arabic 12 English-language titles from the Penguin Classics series, in addition to publishing up to eight original Arabic classics. The first titles will be available in early 2011. According to the press …

Iraqi Books Hit the International Market for First Time Since the War

In English Language by Chip Rossetti

• Iraq’s publishing and bookselling industry has been damaged by decades of war, sanctions and violence. • However, Baghdad’s al-Muthanna Library — a traditional Iraqi publishing and bookselling powerhouse — has just released its first catalog of fiction and non-fiction titles for the international market since the war. By Chip Rossetti BAGHDAD: Founded in 1936, the al-Muthanna Library in Baghdad …

Do Cash Awards Promote Publishing in Growth Markets?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Today’s lead story covers the ongoing Sharjah International Book Fair. This year, the Fair introduced three new book awards for English language works (discussed in the piece). In addition, the Egypt-based Dar El Shorouk won the second edition of the Etisalat Prize for Arabic Children’s Literature with the book, Al Noqta Al Sawda (The Black Dot), written …

Web-based Entrepreneurs in the Arab World

In Arabic Publishing by Chip Rossetti

By Chip Rossetti Today’s Gulf News — the English-language daily based in Dubai — has an interesting piece on entrepreneurs in Lebanon who are using social media to build their businesses on the web. The first profiled is a comics-blogger-turned-author, Maya Zankoul, who ended up self-publishing her book, Amalgam, because no local publisher would take it on: even with a …