What is the Most Literary City on Earth?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Buenos Aires has been named World Book Capital for 2011 by UNESCO. UNESCO began the practice of naming World Book Capitals in 2001. Cities so honored include Madrid (Spain), followed by Alexandria (Egypt), New Delhi (India), Antwerp (Belgium), Montreal (Canada), Turin (Italy), Bogotá (Colombia), Amsterdam (Netherlands), Beirut (Lebanon), and Ljubljana (Slovenia). In 2012 the title goes to …

Have the Anglos Lost Too Much in Translation?

In Editorial & Opinion by Guest Contributor

Editorial by Kelvin Smith A spirited defense of reading “foreign” books When was the last time you read a book written in a foreign language? If you are a fan of crime fiction, probably it wasn’t so long ago. Or you might be one of the millions of readers of Paolo Coelho or Haruki Murakami. On the face of it …

Russian Publishing is No “Depressing” Siberia; E-book Innovation from Bookmate.ru

In Europe by Edward Nawotka

By Hannah Johnson and Edward Nawotka As the Market Focus of this year’s London Book Fair, Russia shows off its literary culture, growing e-book market and readiness for international cooperation. As the Market Focus of this year’s London Book Fair, Russia was represented by a robust program of events featuring authors, publishers and industry experts — truly the elite of …

Join Project D in Reading Dostoevsky’s Demons starting Monday, April 18

In What's the Buzz by Edward Nawotka

Starting on Monday, April 18, at Project D, Publishing Perspectives’ examination of the four major novels of Fyodor Dostoevsky, we will begin reading The Possessed, or as it’s called in our preferred translation by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky, Demons. Described by Joseph Frank as “probably the greatest novel ever inspired by a revolutionary conspiracy,” it is most likely the …

Reading the Age of Screens, Continued

In What's the Buzz by Hannah Johnson

By Hannah Johnson Publishing Perspectives contributor and publisher of Open Letter Press, Chad W. Post, wrote a piece called “Reading in the Age of Screens” in which he discussed how book discovery works in the digital age. He asked how readers can find the “pattern-breaking” books, the truly revolutionary literature that is unlike anything they’ve read before, in an age …

Fiction Longlist Announced for 2011 Best Translated Book Awards

In Global Trade Talk by Hannah Johnson

By Hannah Johnson Now in its fifth year, the Best Translated Book Awards (BTBA) fiction longlist highlights 25 translated works of literature published in the United States in 2010. The longlist represents authors from 19 countries writing in 12 languages. The award was started in 2007 by Three Percent, a blog about literature in translation from Open Letter Press. Co-founder …

Will 2011 Be the Year Translated Lit Gains Traction in the US?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Today’s lead story looks at the surprise success of Words Without Borders and their new anthology Tablet & Pen. Yes it might merely be wishful thinking, but could translated lit finally be gaining some traction in the US? The consensus is that “American’s don’t read translated lit” and as we’ve written here before, there are valid reasons …