Romance vs. Sexy Literary Fiction: What’s the Distinction?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Today’s lead story examines the publishing history of Stephen Vizinczey’s In Praise of Older Women, a novel that is considered by many to be a classic of modern European literature — but has had a checkered publishing history in the United States. Surely, there have been no shortage of literary censorship cases in the United States — …

How to Find New Spanish Books to Publish

In Global Trade Talk, Resources by Emily Williams

By Emily Williams New Spanish Books, a project backed by the Spanish Institute for Foreign Trade (ICEX) and the Spanish Publishers Association (FGEE), has announced a call for new titles to be included in their fall selection of featured titles for translation. A more established version of the German site launched in March, the idea of the UK site is …

3rd PalFest — Palestine Festival of Literature — Begins May 1

In Global Trade Talk by Olivia Snaije

By Olivia Snaije The third Palestine Festival of Literature begins May 1st and will run until May 6th, with international writers and artists traveling to the West Bank. This young festival was created by Egyptian novelist Ahdaf Soueif, British authors and journalists Victoria Brittain and Brigid Keenan, among others, in 2008 with the mission to bring writers and artists from …

Proust: The Perfect Beach Read

In What's the Buzz by Edward Nawotka

By Dennis Abrams Spring is here, summer will fast be upon us, and for most readers, it’s the time for fat juicy mindless paperback novels, perfect for idling away the time while at the beach or on vacation. This year though, why not try something different? There’s still time to join us on our year long journey through Marcel Proust’s …

Is Literature Useful as an Instrument of “Soft Power?”

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka In today’s lead story about the Chinese book market, Dr. Luc Kwanten of the Big Apple literary agency says that in recent years China has been promoting the export of its literature — either by supporting translations or participating in book fairs — as an exercise in “soft power.” “Soft power” is itself something of an amorphous …

Does Literature Still Have the Power to Irritate Powers-that-be?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka In today’s lead story Daniel Kalder writes about Russia’s Ad Marginem Press, a “underground” publisher of controversial and politically provocative works of fiction and nonfiction. Ad Marginem publisher Alexander Ivanov says the press may have something of an advantage in attracting an audience, in so far as “literature [in Russia] may still -– as it did in …

Publishing Poetry? Market to Australians!

In Global Trade Talk by Hannah Johnson

By Hannah Johnson According to a survey conducted by the Australia Council for the Arts, 84% of Australians are avid readers of literature and one in five survey respondents read poetry. The results also showed that 15-24 year-olds are the most engaged in creating art online, whether that is writing, visual arts, theater or music. The Australia Council even made …

Does Turning Classics into Video Games Indoctrinate Readers?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka There’s a trend going on: We’re seeing more and more classics being turned into video games. Today’s lead story describes how Nintendo is planning to release 100 French language classics for their Nintendo DS handheld game machine (something they’ve already done in Japan and the UK). Earlier this month we saw the release of a video game …