India’s First Comic Con Draws 15,000, Homegrown Heroes Are a Hit

In Growth Markets by Guest Contributor

Editorial by Andrew Dodd, editorial director, Campfire DELHI: It has never happened before, but it’s sure to happen again. Last weekend, fifteen thousand comic book fans gathered together in Delhi for India’s first ever Comic Con. Comic Con India proves there is untapped potential for comics and graphic novels in the region. The two-day convention was a phenomenal success, far …

Is There a Global Market for Indian Comics and Children’s Books?

In Children's, Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka The first annual Comic Con in India was held last weekend and, according to Andrew Dodd of Campfire Books, it was a runaway success. Homegrown stories from Indian publishers and featuring Indian heroes were especially popular. While Dodd acknowledges that the comics market in India is still “nascent,” there might be potential for Indian publishers to market …

Advantage India: Delhi’s Campfire Classics Hark Back to Golden Age of Comics

In Growth Markets by Edward Nawotka

• Indian graphic novel publisher Campfire Books has begun exporting affordable Western classics to the US and other English-speaking nations around the world. • Among the advantages the company has is the ability to keep most of the work in-house. The company employs a bullpen of 20 full-time artists on staff to do with drawing and coloring, thus helping to keep …

India Gets Its First Homegrown E-reader

In Global Trade Talk by Hannah Johnson

By Hannah Johnson Meet the Wink, India’s first e-reader launched by Bangalore-based digital publisher EC Media International. Launched Thursday, the Wink eReaders are available in Wi-Fi and 3G models priced at INR 11,490 ($247) and INR 14,990 ($323). The Wink supports 15 Indian languages (a good thing in a country with 22 official languages) and has access to the Wink …

Heros, Gundas: India’s Resurgent Paperback Pulp

In Global Trade Talk by Emily Williams

By Emily Williams Much like our story from earlier this year discussing the popularity of Mills and Boon in India, The Washington Post has a fascinating glimpse into India’s fast-growing publishing industry through a look at the resurgence of old pulp fiction paperback novels including “campy vampire serials, supernatural thrillers, and a slew of Hindi crime novels featuring fast-talking detectives, …

Save the Date: GLOBALOCAL Confab about Post-colonial Publishing

In Global Trade Talk by Edward Nawotka

By Mark Garcia-Prats GLOBALOCAL: The Forum for Content is a one day conference taking place in New Delhi, India on November 26, 2010. The Conference “will explore the domination of a largely western culture (or the ‘actual’ English speaking world) of the markets in the post-colonial economies and the emergence of the local player in the ‘other’ English speaking world.” …

Bye Bye Twitter, Hello Bubbly

In What's the Buzz by Erin L. Cox

By Erin L. Cox Just when you think you’ve mastered Twitter, there’s a new social media network that’s gaining ground, Bubbly. Started by the Silicon Valley and Singapore-based company, Bubble Motion — a global provider of mobile messaging and social media applications, Bubbly is said to act like Twitter, where you can follow your favorite voices using your cellphone. For book …

In the Age of E-books, Does the Cheap Paperback Have a Future?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Today’s lead story discusses Penguin’s 75th anniversary campaign in Australia, New Zealand and India which has seen the company reissue backlist titles from their line at the low price of AU$9.95. The result has been sales that have exceeded more than 250,000 copies in their first three months — a phenomenal sales pace. The series has proved …

Can the Mega-author Exist Without the Mega-bookstore?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka In our lead article today, Liz Bury writes about the launch of Mills & Boon India, prompted in part by the widespread use of English, globalized communications and the growth of India’s middle-class, which likes to shop in the new chain bookstores and supermarket-style outlets in India’s metro centers and their newly-built shopping malls. The shift has …