German Bookstore Chains Growing, But Modestly

In German Buch News by Siobhan O'Leary

By Siobhan O’Leary German bookstore chains are continuing to grow but at a more modest pace than in previous years, given the general decrease in mergers and new store openings. According to the 21st annual report on the largest bookstore chains released by buchreport, market leader Thalia, owned by Douglas AG, increased its lead over the Hugendubel and Weltbild chains …

French Expect E-books to Push Book Prices Down

In Global Trade Talk by Siobhan O'Leary

By Siobhan O’Leary A study conducted in France and reported in Livres Hebdo shows that 83% of French people “ignore” fixed book prices (i.e. are not aware of them) when making purchasing decisions. In fact, they think that that brick and mortar bookstores are a more expensive sales channel in comparison to online retailers when, in reality, book prices are …

2009 US Bookstore Sales Fell .8%, to $16.6bn

In What's the Buzz by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka US bookstore sales fell 0.8% in 2009, to $16.60 billion, while overall retail sales dropped 2.2%, according to preliminary results from the U.S. Census Bureau and as reported in Publishers Weekly. While it might not look like much of an improvement — the number is still a drop after all — it is a significant improvement from …

Radical Changes Needed to Put UK E-book Strategy on Track

In Digital by Liz Bury

By Liz Bury It was a curious experience listening to speakers at the recent e-books industry strategy event in London, run by the digital directors group of the UK Publishers Association. A lot of rational ideas about how to combat piracy were being talked about, like how improving access to content and enhancing the quality of experience offered to e-book …

Internet, Critics Motivate Book Buyers in Germany

In German Buch News by Siobhan O'Leary

By Siobhan O’Leary What draws customers into bookstores in Germany and how well informed are they about what they will find there? Cologne-based agency Die Gefährten recently attempted to answer these questions by surveying 400 book-buying customers from the bookstores Mayersche and Stern Verlag in Düsseldorf and Hugendubel in Munich. According to the survey, the results of which were published …

Why Mumbai’s Hot for Mills & Boon

In Growth Markets by Liz Bury

By Liz Bury MUMBAI: Of the numerous UK publishing houses to set up new operations in India during the past few years, Mills and Boon has perhaps the best brand recognition among its target audience. The publisher’s special formula of boy-meets-girl romance found a loyal readership in India during the 1980s and 1990s, when English language editions were first exported …

Amazon.de Guilty of Flouting Fixed Price Laws

In German Buch News by Siobhan O'Leary

By Siobhan O’Leary In the David vs. Goliath-esque battle between Buchhandlung Schopf in northern Germany and Amazon, the little guy has come out on top.  As we reported last month, the bookstore took Amazon to court for allegedly flouting Germany’s fixed book price laws. According to the Buchreport the Hamburg regional court has ruled against Amazon, stating that it must …

Booksellers to Shed Clothes to Save Jobs

In German Buch News by Siobhan O'Leary

By Siobhan O’Leary Fewer Germans are landing training jobs at bookstores, says the German Federal Institute for Vocational Education and Training. As reported in buchreport, just 578 people completed apprenticeships in bookselling in 2009, that’s some 26.6% fewer than in 2008.  This may not come as a huge surprise given that both the Hugendubel and Mayersche book chains announced last …

German Booksellers Optimistic, Shun Self Help

In German Buch News by Siobhan O'Leary

By Siobhan O’Leary German book retailers are a lot more optimistic at the start of 2010 than they were a year ago. According to a survey conducted by buchreport, only 30% of booksellers are skeptical about their prospects for this year (compared to around 50% who anticipated a decline in business last year). However, publishers of non-fiction and particularly self-help …

Name Your “Lost” Books

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Today’s lead story discusses the phenomenon of the bookseller who is frustrated at not being able to deliver the books that his customer is asking for — some obscure, some rather well-known, but for some reason, unavailable for purchase. These aren’t necessarily books that haven’t been translated. On the contrary, they are often available in an English …