How Should Bookstores Cope with the Ebook Era?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Today’s lead story looks at Manhattan’s Three Lives & Co. Bookstore. One of the store’s philosophies is keep the store running very much same way it has since it opened its doors in 1968. The question of how to cope in this era of e-books and economic recession is one facing bookstores all over the world. Should …

Germany’s Thalia Bookstore to Launch Dedicated E-Reader in October

In German Buch News by Siobhan O'Leary

By Siobhan O’Leary Following in the footsteps of Barnes & Noble in the US, Germany’s largest book chain Thalia is set to release its own e-reader in October. In a statement to the Boersenblatt, Thalia spokeswoman Mirjam Berle announced that further details about the device (including partners secured) would be revealed on September 4th at the IFA conference in Berlin. …

Could You Run a Bookstores With Just an Espresso Book Machine?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Today’s lead story looks at how the University of Texas Co-op is implementing a new Espresso Book Machine to launch a publishing house and streamline textbook sales. Of course, the Co-op is not the only bookstore in the country to have such a machine. There are 36 locations where machines have been installed (according to the website …

B.O.B., University of Texas’ $150,000 Book Machine, Readies for Freshman Year

In English Language by Guest Contributor

• The University of Texas Co-op — the most profitable independent college bookstore in the United States — has purchased an Espresso Book Machine. The aim is to revolutionize how the store does business and interacts with the local community. • The store has launched an independent press, is looking at POD textbook solutions, working with local writers, and has plans …

International Buyers Flock to Remaindered Books

In Europe by Edward Nawotka

• Overseas book buyers are finding bargains at American remainder book shows and boosting a business that might otherwise be threatened by the steady decrease in the number independent booksellers and adoption of digital books. • Asian markets — in Japan, Korea and China — have proven especially robust as buyers demand more and more affordable English-language reading materials. By …

Are Publishers Too Quick to Remainder Titles?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Today’s lead story looks at the increasing importance of overseas book buyers to the remainder book market. There’s no exact formula for the amount of time it takes for a title to be released, returned and remaindered, but most authors would agree that the window publishers allow a book to gain traction in the marketplace before it’s …

Dropping by the Almost Corner Bookshop in Rome’s Trastevere

In Global Trade Talk by Rachel Aydt

By Rachel Aydt New York writer Rachel Aydt is traveling through Europe this summer, and has been filing occasional posts on her bookish adventures. Today, she visits an English-language bookshop in Rome. We headed to Rome for a few days after spending two days with my mom and stepdad, who’d done an apartment swap in Anzio (despite its somber WWII …

Do Booksellers Promote Too Many Titles at Once?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Today’s lead story describes some of the bookselling strategies of London’s Daunt Books. One focus of the piece is the fact that the bookstore displays just one or two titles in the windows per week, a move that has led to significant sales of certain titles. A carefully edited and curated selection of titles can be a …

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The Bookselling Secrets of London’s Daunt Books

In Europe by Guest Contributor

• Independent bookselling is not dead, but it takes close attention to the details — and a carefully edited selection of books — to thrive in the real world. • Selective promotion supported by review coverage and bookseller enthusiasm are the key to moving dozens of books a day out the door. By Edward Nawotka LONDON: One title displayed at …