New Chinese Literary Agency Attracts Top Talent

In Growth Markets by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Literary agencies are a relatively unknown quantity in China and almost all started as overseas operations, including Big Apple Tuttle Mori Agency and Bardon Chinese Media, which both started in Taiwan, and Andrew Nurnberg Associates, from the UK. The latest newcomer — Peony Literary Agency — hails from Hong Kong. Launched in November by Marysia Juszczakiewicz to …

Global Trade Talk: Google Editions to Launch in Japan; No Sony E-book Store for Germany

In Global Trade Talk by Hannah Johnson

By Hannah Johnson and Siobhan O’Leary According Japanese business daily Nikkei (source: MarketWatch), Google has announced its plans to launch its e-book store service Google Edition in Japan in 2010. Prices will be determined by book publishers, and Google says it will keep 63% of the sales price. Google Edition is also scheduled to launch in the spring of 2010 …

Singapore Showcases Homegrown Literary Talent

In Feature Articles by Guest Contributor

By Marysia Juszczakiewicz SINGAPORE: When one thinks of writing from Asia and Southeast Asia, one tends to think primarily of the big nations with long, established literary traditions, such as China and Japan. But there is just as much literary action elsewhere in the East. Singapore, for example, is on a mission to find, develop and nurture creative writing at …

Bonus Material: Is Asia Truly Ahead of the West in Digital Innovation and Adoption?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka In today’s lead article about the Singapore Writers Festival, Peter Gordon, Hong Kong publisher of Chameleon Press, suggested that some parts of Asia were slow movers in the race towards literary digitization. He said: E-publishing “is awaited with a combination of anticipation of the possibilities and trepidation about the effects it may have on the traditional publishing …

What’s the Buzz: Germany’s Publishing Widows; Why Asian Crime Isn’t Popular; Larsson’s Partner offered $3 Million

In What's the Buzz by Edward Nawotka

By Siobhan O’Leary and Edward Nawotka Though most of Germany’s largest media companies were founded by men, the tagespiegel points out how many of these companies have since been taken over by the younger wives of said founders. Instead of “publishers”, they are “publishers’ widows”, though they wield as much power as their husbands did. Friede Springer (Axel Springer Verlag) …

The Strange World of Yakuza Fan Magazines

In Feature Articles by Guest Contributor

By Jake Adelstein TOKYO: The Japanese mafia, better known as the yakuza, has been the subject of fan magazines for decades. These magazines serve as de-facto trade periodicals for a world of vicious, autocratic thugs, men who are handy with swords and guns, sport full-body tattoos, deal in illegal contraband and laundered money, and rip off the general public; all …

Bonus Material: Be Nice to the Yakuza, Or Else

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Jake Adelstein So, you want to become a Gokudokisha 極道記者, or rather, a journalist who writes about the yakuza? Then you should now there are some unwritten rules you will be expected to follow. (Read more about yazuka fan magazines here.) 1) No writing about ongoing criminal ventures or front companies. 2) When writing about yakuza arrested for extortion, …

German Buch News: HMH Expanding to Germany; New Beijing Outpost for German Pubs

In German Buch News by Siobhan O'Leary

By Siobhan O’Leary Houghton Mifflin Harcourt is planning to expand overseas, and in particular into Germany, which it has dubbed “the most important market”, according to Buchreport. Once the company explores the German market further, including the specifics of the German schoolbook market and public school system, it will be seeking publishing and distribution partners. The publisher will focus on …

Bonus Material: Video Interview with China’s Shanda Literature Ltd.

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka At Frankfurt this year, no single company made a bigger first impression on the international marketplace than Shanda Literature Ltd. of Shanghai, China. The online publishing company claims to have accumulated the largest and fastest-growing database of copywritten work in the country—some 2.7 million titles—and is just one year old. We sat down to talk with Shanda …