Singapore Holds First Children’s “Content” Festival

In Children's by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka This past weekend, the first Asian Festival of Children’s Content was held in Singapore. It may be the first literary festival of it’s kind to replace the word “literature” with “content.” But, hey, Singapore has always viewed itself as a progressive nation-state. Claire Chiang, the festival’s advisory board chairperson, told Publishers Weekly’s Terry Tan: “We have had …

Anchee Min Offers a Chinese Look at Pearl S. Buck

In What's the Buzz by Edward Nawotka

By Ed Nawotka Anchee Min’s new novel Pearl of China re-imagines the life of Nobel Prize-winner Pearl S. Buck (The Good Earth) from a Chinese perspective for what is perhaps the first time. She spoke about the book, which is told from the point of view of a contemporary of Buck, at a recent event at the Asia Society in New York. …

Survey Says: 25% of Chinese Have Read an E-Book

In Global Trade Talk by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka The Global Times of China reports on the results of the 7th National Reading Survey in China which indicated that 25% of those surveyed — some 19,000 people — have read a digital book. The survey conducted by the General Administration of Press and Publication (GAPP), the department of the Chinese government that oversees books and publishing, and …

All Information Doesn’t Want to Be Free

In Digital by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka “Copyright holders have the right to price and term the works that they have created, the works that they own. That’s a stake in the ground. I couldn’t do what I do for a living without believing that,” says Tracey Armstrong (pictured right), CEO of the Copyright Clearance Center, in a conversation earlier this week on the …

Is Literature Useful as an Instrument of “Soft Power?”

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka In today’s lead story about the Chinese book market, Dr. Luc Kwanten of the Big Apple literary agency says that in recent years China has been promoting the export of its literature — either by supporting translations or participating in book fairs — as an exercise in “soft power.” “Soft power” is itself something of an amorphous …

Has Holden Caulfield Been Supplanted by Lisbeth Salander?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka In today’s lead story Big Apple literary agency discusses trying to find another J.D. Salinger in Shanghai. “We are particularly interested in young authors whose books handle contemporary problems in society,” says Dr. Luc Kwanten, co-founder of Big Apple. “When it comes to China, we are looking for writers who were born in the post-Mao era, in …

Bye Bye Twitter, Hello Bubbly

In What's the Buzz by Erin L. Cox

By Erin L. Cox Just when you think you’ve mastered Twitter, there’s a new social media network that’s gaining ground, Bubbly. Started by the Silicon Valley and Singapore-based company, Bubble Motion — a global provider of mobile messaging and social media applications, Bubbly is said to act like Twitter, where you can follow your favorite voices using your cellphone. For book …

Is Asia Underrepresented in World Literature?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka Today’s lead story by Miguel Syjuco discusses changes to the Man Asia Literary Prize, an award that was designed to bring more attention to writers from Asia. Considering that some 60% of the world’s population lives in Asia, many of them eager to learn English and exchange cultural ideas, it brings up the question: Is Asia underrepresented …

Asian Prize Changes Seem Puzzling, But Perhaps For the Better

In Editorial & Opinion by Guest Contributor

Editorial by Miguel Syjuco, Winner of the 2008 Man Asian Literary Prize MONTREAL: When news arrived this week that the Man Asian Literary Prize would no longer be accepting unpublished manuscripts, and instead only published novels, dismay broke out among writers. On blogs, newsgroups, email, and networking sites, the communal shock developed into debate. On one side, the door through …

Did Working in Publishing Abroad Help Your Career at Home?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

By Edward Nawotka As our continuing series on “publishing expats” continues (read the first article here and today’s article here), it raises the question of whether working abroad is a benefit or a detriment to your career. The personal advantages are obvious, but professionally, it can go either way. My personal experience was mixed. I found that on returning to …