Can a North American E-bookseller Dominate Europe?

In Discussion by Edward Nawotka

Are readers too nationalistic to be seduced by a business from overseas? Are the cultures too varied for one-company-fits-all solution?

By Edward Nawotka

Kobo logo on Touch eReader

As Siobhan O’Leary discusses in today’s feature story, both Amazon and Kobo have recently begun selling e-books in Germany. Germany, which is the world’s second largest book market behind the United States, is a huge opportunity for the right bookseller — but so far, at least in the case of Amazon, the reception to foreigners has been lukewarm.

Across Europe, from the France to Spain to Italy numerous e-booksellers are vying for early e-book adopters. The competition is fierce, often with the edge going to homegrown upstarts that can provide devices tuned to the local language and tastes, as well as site that offer a user experience that reflects the local culture. So, much like yesterday’s discussion question regarding whether¬†European bookstores might have enough brand equity to open abroad, we’re wondering today whether or not North American e-bookseller ever hope to dominate Europe?¬†

Are readers too nationalistic to be seduced by a business from overseas? Are the cultures too varied for one-company-fits-all solution?

About the Author

Edward Nawotka

A widely published critic and essayist, Edward Nawotka serves as a speaker, educator and consultant for institutions and businesses involved in the global publishing and content industries. He was also editor-in-chief of Publishing Perspectives since the launch of the publication in 2009 until January 2016.